Make Backup Before Ditching Mac OS X Mavericks For Yosemite

Are you using Mac OS?  If you are, you probably have heard all about how Apple just released the newest yet Mac OS X Yosemite.  I’d read some of the comments on various websites, and it seems that people are having mixed feeling about Apple’s newest OS.  Some people think Mac OS X Yosemite is ugly or just too plain.  In my opinion, I like it so far, because I like Apple’s simplicity design UI (User Interface) for Mac OS X.    With OS X Yosemite, things look to be simplified even further in term of the look of the OS.  Basically, Apple is trying to make Mac OS X to look like iOS, giving the users a feeling of unification between the two different systems.  Just like how Microsoft is trying to unify Windows Desktop and Windows Phone operating systems, Apple is doing the same thing.  I guess, by combining the ecosystems of the two systems together, thus Microsoft and Apple can provide same services for both systems (i.e., mobile devices and desktop computers).  Besides the point of providing the same services for both systems, these two companies are trying to create a togetherness feeling for applications and whatnot, thus providing a smooth service for different types of devices/systems.  I like this idea very much!

Although I like the idea of combining different ecosystems of different types of devices and systems together so the endusers can feel the applications that they work with become smoother in term of workflow and playflow (I made this word up), but to make the togetherness feeling happens Apple has to pool the services into the cloud.  This might be a good thing but also a bad thing!  For an example, iCloud is now becoming iCloud Drive — which is a good thing as endusers can now selectively browse the individual data within — and iCloud Drive will become evermore the focus point for hackers to try with hardy effort to hack into endusers’ data.  As Apple relies more on the cloud to provide essential services for endusers’ apps, it’s imperatively evermore for hackers to target Apple’s cloud services since endusers’ data are most likely pool abundantly into the cloud.  Instead of chasing different targets, hackers can just hack endusers’ cloud data to harvest whatever they need with less time wasting.  Cloud is good for endusers’ togetherness feeling, but it’s bad for endusers’ data security if Apple will ever provide the opportunity for hackers to loot endusers’ data.  In my opinion, Apple’s newest OS yet [cloudworries] me.  Recently, hackers were successfully hacked into banks and Home Depot, thus millions of endusers’ confidential data are at risks of being exposed to the blackmarket.

Besides of being dangerous but pretty and simplistic, you may find that it’s rather dangerously thrilling to upgrade Mavericks to Yosemite.  If you don’t do any backup for your Mavericks, you may not want to rush to upgrade to Yosemite.  I found out that once you upgrade to Yosemite, you cannot downgrade your Yosemite to Mavericks unless you wipe your hard drive cleanly and freshly install Mavericks.  Of course, others may have ways to downgrade Yosemite to Mavericks that I do not know of, but it’s for sure that Yosemite destroys the Mavericks’ built-in recovery partition and creates a Yosemite recovery partition.  This means that when you want to reinstall OS X through the fresh boot up or reboot gray screen using Command + R keys on the keyboard, Yosemite is the only built-in recovery you get to play with after you had upgraded the Mavericks to Yosemite.  Even if you have a USB thumb drive for Mavericks’ root installation files, Yosemite will complain how your Mavericks’ files are too old, consequently you cannot use the Mavericks’ files to downgrade Yosemite.

I’ve found this out the hard way as I had to wipe out my Mac HD just so to reinstall Yosemite fresh in order for Yosemite to work correctly on my Mac.   Luckily, I’d made backups of my essential data on my Mac before I said goodbye to all of my essential data.  Basically, the trouble was all about how Yosemite refused to let my Mac to have any Internet connectivity.  After I meddling with all network settings to be sure that the settings were right, Yosemite was even more steadfast in not allowing my Mac to have any Internet connectivity.  My only option left was to freshly reinstall Yosemite, because downgrading Yosemite to Mavericks might just be a lot harder.  Luckily, fresh installation of Yosemite was the solution.  Now, my Mac is connecting to the Internet just fine, and I’m having a blast of writing this blog post on Yosemite.  Like I said, please do many backups of your data before you even think about letting go of Mavericks or whatever OS X version you’re on, because Yosemite is that dangerously pretty and simplistic and cloudworried.

I found a pretty good YouTube video which explains Yosemite’s newest features in detail.  Enjoy the video right after the break!!!

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Stop Bashing Windows 8, It’s Easy Really…

Once again, more Windows 8 haters came out to bash Windows 8 as Frank Shaw, VP of Corporate Communications at Microsoft, defended Windows 8 with his “Staying centered” blog post.  Personally, I think Windows 8 is refreshing and better than all older Windows versions.  How come?  The new user interface (desktop environment) is not that hard as how people make it to be.  Imagine how much harder it will be for the people who think Windows 8 is hard to use when the future is all about different user interfaces.  Imagine what if we have to interact with holographic interface as a way to interact with computer, will people complain how much harder this will be?  I know, I somewhat don’t make sense now, but I think as the present speeds up into the future, I think I will make a lot more sense then.

I think Microsoft is doing it right with Windows 8, but since everybody is complaining, Microsoft should make the Windows Live Tile Screen as the secondary screen and not the primary one.  Microsoft should make Windows 7 desktop environment as the primary screen for Windows 8.  This way, everyone won’t have any complaint about the Windows Live Tile Screen since it’s in the background.  When people need the Windows Live Tile Screen, they can hot corner it whenever.  Personally, I use Windows 7 desktop environment much more than Windows 8 Live Tile Screen, but I love to have Windows 8 Live Tile Screen for organizing apps and having quick glances as live information from the live tiles.

Overall, I think Windows 8 is so much more robust than all older Windows versions.  Under the hood, Windows 8 got so much more features that are way cooler and necessary than all older Windows versions.  I don’t think we should disregard the new features Windows 8 brought to us (e.g., file history, ribbon interface, live tile, better security, etc…), because with these new features I have been enjoyed Windows 8 a lot more than the older Windows versions.  On another topic, I think Windows 8 Live Tile Screen is perfect for tablets and smartphones.

After thought:  I know everyone has different taste when it comes down to using computer, therefore my personal view on Windows 8 should not be dictated as my saying that everyone who hates Windows 8 is wrong.  I’m not saying that people who hate Windows 8 are wrong, but I’m just saying that they should give Windows 8 a chance.  Furthermore, they should try to learn how to use Windows 8 before they bash Windows 8.  Once again, personally, I never have a problem of using Windows 8 interface at all.  In fact, I find Windows 8 interface is rather easy.  If I can use Windows 8 interface, everyone else too should be able to use Windows 8 interface without any difficulty.  It is not that hard really!!!