Be The Master Of Your ownCloud Data, Installing ownCloud And Run A Similar DropBox Service Privately For Free

Dropbox and various online third party cloud services are great and free to certain expectations, but to truly have all you can eat buffet kind of expectation is definitely not the kind of thing that these cloud services can provide.  Right off the bat, one thing for sure that these third party cloud services cannot provide is the best privacy level that one could get with having storing data within one’s own private network.  Want to have more cloud space than the so called free space?  It’s not free, and you have to pay more for how many more Gigabytes you want and so forth.

ownCloud is a free, open source software which acts like DropBox, but you can download, install, and use it freely.  I think ownCloud does give you the opportunity to be 100% in control of your data’s privacy.  If you know how to implement robust security measures such as proper firewall and port-forwarding, you can even allow yourself to roam the seven seas and still be able to sync with your local data securely.  Unlike DropBox and other third party cloud services, you know you’re the master of your own data in the cloud when it comes to ownCloud those data.  OK, I begin to rant on unnecessarily.

Anyhow, want to know how to install ownCloud and use it?  Check out the video right after the break, I show you how to install ownCloud on Linux Mint.  Of course, you can follow the video’s instruction to do the same for Ubuntu, because Linux Mint is just an Ubuntu based distribution.  Enjoy!!!

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Installing And Securing Linux Mint 17, And Installing Adobe Reader

I was installing Linux Mint 17 for a virtual machine on my PC, and I decided it was a good idea to record the whole process.  Furthermore, I also installed Adobe Reader manually on Linux Mint 17, and so by watching this video you will also know how to do this.  If you’re trying to do what I’ve done within this video, make sure you do not deny shell access and lock the password for the regular user or users that you want to use, because if doing so you will not be able to log into the system.  Of course, if you follow my video closely, deny shell access means editing the /etc/passwd file, and lock password means editing the /etc/shadow file by executing the command line passwd -l [username].

Moreover, if you’re trying to edit the /etc/fstab file as I’d done in the video, make sure you make a copy of the original /etc/fstab file first before editing the original /etc/fstab file.  /etc/fstab file is very important, because it tells the system how to load up the devices such as hard drive, and screwing this file up will prevent your system from loading/booting.  Having the original copy of /etc/fstab file will allow you to restore it in the case that you screw up the original /etc/fstab file.

If you are going to pay close attention to my part of editing /etc/fstab file, you will notice that I’d made error on adding rw option to the /tmp and /dev/shm devices, but you will also notice that I had correct the errors in the video few seconds later.  Basically, rw option is correct, but in the video, before I made the option as rw I had the option as wr.  By having the option as wr, the system won’t recognize this option.  So instead of wr, it should be rw.

rw is a permission option.  By adding rw option to /tmp and /dev/shm, the /tmp and /dev/shm devices won’t allow anything to execute commands in these devices, but these devices only allow whatever to read and write to them.  Anyhow, you can check out this video right after the break.  Enjoy!!!

How To Connect And Mount iSCSI Onto Ubuntu And Linux Mint

In the video right after the break, I show you how to connect to iSCSI target and mount iSCSI LUN onto Ubuntu and Linux Mint.  Enjoy!!!

How To Permanently Mount Network Share Onto Ubuntu And Linux Mint

In the video right after the break, I briefly talk about how to permanently mount a network share onto Ubuntu and Linux Mint.  Enjoy!!!

Can Ubuntu 12.10 Replace Windows 7? (YouTube Video)

Can Ubuntu 12.10 replace Windows 7?  Obviously, we have Windows 8 now.  Nonetheless, some people are still preferring Windows 7 over Windows 8.  Ubuntu 12.10 is a good comparison to Windows 7, and so it might be a good alternative for Windows 7.  I’ve found a great video on YouTube which goes through various popular Windows 7 tasks on Ubuntu 12.10, to see if Ubuntu 12.10 can replace Windows 7 or not.  Enjoy!!!

Installing KDE Desktop Environment On Ubuntu 12.10

Sweet, the "previews" feature just a...

Sweet, the “previews” feature just arrived on the #Unity desktop of my pre-alpha 12.10 #Quantal Quetzal #Ubuntu #Linux (Photo credit: xmacex)

Ubuntu released its latest iteration couple days ago if I’m not mistaken, and it’s known as Ubuntu 12.10.  Ubuntu 12.10 is nice and all, but I’ve noticed that its default desktop graphical user interface which is Unity is super sluggish for older hardware and virtual machine.  With that being said, if you have a newer computer hardware and better graphic card, Unity on Ubuntu 12.10 should be very responsive, and you won’t have a bad experience at all.  Anyhow, since I’m going to use Ubuntu 12.10 in a virtual environment for some time to come, this is why I had installed another desktop graphical user interface which is known as KDE for Ubuntu 12.10.  With KDE desktop graphical user interface, things should be zippier on Ubuntu 12.10 when Ubuntu runs on a virtual machine.  Anyhow, I have made a video on showing whoever wants to know how to install KDE desktop graphical user interface on Ubuntu 12.10, and you can check this video out right after the break.  Enjoy!!!