That Poetical Sense In The Night (Book Publishing)

I started out writing poetry in my spare time for fun since March of 2013. Since July of 2014 I began to take note of my extensive poetry collection, and so I decided to create a book for my poems. This very book, “That Poetical Sense In The Night,” is the result of my spare time poetry writing. The title of this book is from one of those very early poems that I’d written in March of 2013. The book started out with the latest poem that I’d written working toward to the end of the book in which my earliest poem would be inscribed therein. I’d written my poems according to my feeling at specific moments in time, and so many of my poems were written in free verse. Nonetheless, in some of these poetical moments I did manage to have form my poems in various poetical forms. My poems depict from humanity to eureka moment, and so I think my poems do cover a wide area of things.

Now you can get this poetry book of mine at Amazon’s Kindle Store.

 

Book Exclusivity Trend Might Be The New Rise Of Book Publishing, But It Might Be Expensive For Customers To Buy eBooks

English: TCU's Barnes and Noble Bookstore.

Image via Wikipedia

Engadget’s Barnes & Noble to pull Amazon Publishing titles from shelves over exclusivity concerns article suggests Barnes & Noble has turned up the heat as the two go on competing each other for a book market domination.  Of course, Barnes & Noble is worrying that Amazon will eventually kick them out of their own game.  Meanwhile, Amazon continues to do the impossible even though Amazon is relatively new player in the book world when one compares Amazon against Barnes & Noble.  Seniority doesn’t secure a permanent establishment since we have seen how Borders had filed for bankruptcy from Chapter 11 which eventually turned into Chapter 7 (Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borders_Group).  The argument which Barnes & Noble has against Amazon is clear to me, but might not be true since I’m not an expert in the operation of the book business, is that Amazon is too pushy in term of demanding for more exclusivity with various book publishers.  I have to wonder though, would this be a good thing for book publishers?

Why?  If book publishers can negotiate with particular distributors for exclusivity deal, it might in the end raising the value of the book publishers who go for exclusive deals since exclusivity means rarity.  We know most things that are rare might be more valuable, right?  What if we take a look at a much bigger picture, how would the book world fare if only big players such as Amazon would be able to acquire exclusivities from popular book publishing companies?  I’m not sure but I think with more exclusive deals go around the book world, book business might change even more than it’s already has.

The book world already has changed so much in term of how ebook technology has totally changed how consumers read their books, pushing more consumers only to buy ebooks and abandon their traditional books (i.e., books made of papers).  Exclusive deals within the book world might push the change further by having small book stores to go out of business.  These small book stores usually are local book stores.  Of course, the trend seems to head in this particular route anyway since ebook technology has made it so easy for consumers to buy books online.  It means people don’t really have to go to a local book store to buy their books.

To knit the fragments of the big picture together, in my opinion, the trend of pushing for exclusivity isn’t meant the death of book publishing, but it might be the new rise of book publishing.  If Barnes & Noble wants to beat Amazon in book publishing exclusivity trend, I think Barnes & Noble has to figure out how to offer the book publishing companies better deals than what Amazon is currently offering these book publishing companies.

Will the consumers be beneficial to book exclusivity trend?  Probably not in the long run, because I think once a giant book distributor has began to dominate the book exclusivity trend, such entity tends to raise the prices of the books since the competitors aren’t going to have such titles for sale anyway.  The outlook might not be good for book customers if the Amazon defeats Barnes & Noble in book exclusivity trend, because one less competitor will give one less reason for Amazon to sell ebooks at the cheapest prices as possible.  Of course, my speculation on this might not pan out the way I speculate at all, because I’m not an expert in book business anyway.  I guess you just have to take my words with a grain of salt!