Reset ownCloud Passwords For Admin And Users Using phpMyAdmin

Warning:  Following the instruction below at your own risks, because bad things happen!  Don’t blame me for your bravery in destroying ownCloud’s database if something goes wrong and beyond one’s expectation.  Nonetheless, I’ve used the exact directives to successfully change the admin and users passwords for ownCloud.

Forgetting your ownCloud’s password?  Whether your ownCloud’s admin or regular user password is lost, you can always restore or change the password for the admin or user.  Perhaps, you forgot to enter the email address into user’s settings to receive lost password reset email, to think that you’re stuck is being crazy.  Of course, unless you forgot your MySQL database’s root password too, then you really are stuck and won’t be able to access your data that reside within ownCloud.  Nonetheless, let’s hope you aren’t yet out of options, then you can totally use your MySQL’s root password to edit your ownCloud’s admin or user password.  I won’t talk about how to access and edit any other database as I can barely get around MySQL.  Nonetheless, read on and the trick is here to treat you well.

I don’t even bother with MySQL command lines, and so I sure hope you have installed phpMyAdmin.  We will use phpMyAdmin to edit out the oc_users table’s passwords.

  1. So, first of all, log into your ownCloud MySQL’s database as a root user or the owner of ownCloud database through phpMyAdmin.
  2. Secondly, expand the left panel and expand the ownCloud database.  You should see bunch of ownCloud tables underneath ownCloud’s database, and these tables should begin with oc_ extension.  Try to find oc_users!
  3. Click on oc_users to access the oc_users table.  Before you even think aboud editing a user entry within this table, you must know that once you edit a user’s password there is no going back to the original password.  Of course, if you already know the original password, you wouldn’t do this in the first place!
  4. Click on the edit link next to the user to access the oc_users’ user entry.  In here you can change the password for a user.  Don’t do anything yet though, because the passwords store within oc_users table are encrypted with whatever.  If you delete the encrypted passphrase, you basically delete the password.  Nonetheless, you can’t enter a password of your own, because your password isn’t encrypted.  If you try to enter a plain password, your user account won’t see the password change.  Furthermore, if you try to empty out the password, ownCloud’s login page won’t allow you to access ownCloud service even though you had emptied out the password.
  5. If you read my instruction carefully, it means you haven’t done anything yet.  Good, because now you need to open up a web browser’s tab or a new web browser so you can go to http://pajhome.org.uk/crypt/md5/ (link).  If this webpage is still the same and has yet to be changed, under the Demonstration section you should see MD5/SHA-1 boxes.  Instead of entering a real password that can be read by the owner of this website, you need to enter a weak password (that you plan to change it later) into the Input Calculate Result’s top box.  When done entering a temporary password that is easy to remember, hit the SHA-1 button to allow the webpage to generate the SHA-1 hash.  Make sure you copy the SHA-1 hash result in the bottom box.
  6. We need to paste the SHA-1 hash passphrase into the password’s value field (box) of a user you want to change the password for within the database.  So, back in phpMyAdmin, within a user’s entry which resides within the oc_users table, you need to enter the SHA-1 hash into the password’s value field (box).  Hit the Go button which situates right underneath the password’s value field (box).  This should do it.
  7. Now, you can try log into ownCloud service with a new password that you had created for the ownCloud user.  Of course, the password isn’t the SHA-1 hash passphrase, because the ownCloud’s login page expects the regular plain password that you encrypted with SHA-1 hash earlier.  If everything goes as plan, you should be able logging into the ownCloud’s admin or user account.  From, here you can change the password in Personal page, and so you should change the password you just changed for your ownCloud admin or user into a really strong password.

Now, you can chuck down a beer and congratulate yourself a job well done.

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Be The Master Of Your ownCloud Data, Installing ownCloud And Run A Similar DropBox Service Privately For Free

Dropbox and various online third party cloud services are great and free to certain expectations, but to truly have all you can eat buffet kind of expectation is definitely not the kind of thing that these cloud services can provide.  Right off the bat, one thing for sure that these third party cloud services cannot provide is the best privacy level that one could get with having storing data within one’s own private network.  Want to have more cloud space than the so called free space?  It’s not free, and you have to pay more for how many more Gigabytes you want and so forth.

ownCloud is a free, open source software which acts like DropBox, but you can download, install, and use it freely.  I think ownCloud does give you the opportunity to be 100% in control of your data’s privacy.  If you know how to implement robust security measures such as proper firewall and port-forwarding, you can even allow yourself to roam the seven seas and still be able to sync with your local data securely.  Unlike DropBox and other third party cloud services, you know you’re the master of your own data in the cloud when it comes to ownCloud those data.  OK, I begin to rant on unnecessarily.

Anyhow, want to know how to install ownCloud and use it?  Check out the video right after the break, I show you how to install ownCloud on Linux Mint.  Of course, you can follow the video’s instruction to do the same for Ubuntu, because Linux Mint is just an Ubuntu based distribution.  Enjoy!!!

Installing And Securing Linux Mint 17, And Installing Adobe Reader

I was installing Linux Mint 17 for a virtual machine on my PC, and I decided it was a good idea to record the whole process.  Furthermore, I also installed Adobe Reader manually on Linux Mint 17, and so by watching this video you will also know how to do this.  If you’re trying to do what I’ve done within this video, make sure you do not deny shell access and lock the password for the regular user or users that you want to use, because if doing so you will not be able to log into the system.  Of course, if you follow my video closely, deny shell access means editing the /etc/passwd file, and lock password means editing the /etc/shadow file by executing the command line passwd -l [username].

Moreover, if you’re trying to edit the /etc/fstab file as I’d done in the video, make sure you make a copy of the original /etc/fstab file first before editing the original /etc/fstab file.  /etc/fstab file is very important, because it tells the system how to load up the devices such as hard drive, and screwing this file up will prevent your system from loading/booting.  Having the original copy of /etc/fstab file will allow you to restore it in the case that you screw up the original /etc/fstab file.

If you are going to pay close attention to my part of editing /etc/fstab file, you will notice that I’d made error on adding rw option to the /tmp and /dev/shm devices, but you will also notice that I had correct the errors in the video few seconds later.  Basically, rw option is correct, but in the video, before I made the option as rw I had the option as wr.  By having the option as wr, the system won’t recognize this option.  So instead of wr, it should be rw.

rw is a permission option.  By adding rw option to /tmp and /dev/shm, the /tmp and /dev/shm devices won’t allow anything to execute commands in these devices, but these devices only allow whatever to read and write to them.  Anyhow, you can check out this video right after the break.  Enjoy!!!

Blender: My First Blender Project And Experience, A Coffee Cup Is A Lot More Than Hello World Kind Of Things

I’ve known of Blender, open-source/free 3D rendering software, for a long time and installed the latest version onto my PC whenever the opportune moment arrived, but I have never really tried to learn and use it.  Today, I committed some of my time to try to create my first Blender’s 3D rendered image.  By following the “Blender Tutorial For Beginners: Coffee Cup” videos (there are 2 parts), I was able to render a very nice coffee cup.  I did not follow the tutorial videos I mentioned to the letter, because I scaled the middle part of my coffee cup a bit bigger and outward.  Basically, what I meant was that my coffee cup is more round in the overall shape.  Moreover, I rendered the coffee cup with 1000 samplers and .98 clamp.  The tutorial videos rendered the coffee cup with 250 samplers and .98 clamp.  According to the tutorial videos, the higher the number for the samplers of a rendered image, the better the image will look.  I guess, it’s also true for the clamp.  I think the higher the clamp number between 0 and 1, the less fireflies there will be.  The tutorial videos explained that the fireflies are those white pixels that appear in unwanted place when the image gets rendered.  I guess .98 clamp meant 98% for clamp, but please do correct me if I’m wrong on this.

Anyhow, after following the tutorial videos, I got myself a very nice 3D rendered coffee cup image.  Check out the cup right after the break.

Blender 3D rendered cup 01 with 1000 samplers and .98 clamp

You can download the Blender project files that I created for this very image by clicking on this link -> Blender 3D rendered Coffee Cup Project Files By Vinh Nguyen.  I used Blender 2.7 version to render this very 3D coffee cup image.

Right after the break, you can check out the YouTube tutorial videos that I watched and learned to create the coffee cup.

How To Permanently Mount Network Share Onto Ubuntu And Linux Mint

In the video right after the break, I briefly talk about how to permanently mount a network share onto Ubuntu and Linux Mint.  Enjoy!!!

Can Ubuntu 12.10 Replace Windows 7? (YouTube Video)

Can Ubuntu 12.10 replace Windows 7?  Obviously, we have Windows 8 now.  Nonetheless, some people are still preferring Windows 7 over Windows 8.  Ubuntu 12.10 is a good comparison to Windows 7, and so it might be a good alternative for Windows 7.  I’ve found a great video on YouTube which goes through various popular Windows 7 tasks on Ubuntu 12.10, to see if Ubuntu 12.10 can replace Windows 7 or not.  Enjoy!!!