Bad News For Awesome Open Source Email Client Thunderbird, Mozilla May Fully Stop Committing To Thunderbird Development Future

Español: Logitipo del proyecto Thunderbird

Español: Logitipo del proyecto Thunderbird (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’d used Thunderbird before now, but right now I’m using Apple Mail.  I had made a switch to Apple Mail from Thunderbird for two months or so just to test out how well Apple Mail would fair against Thunderbird.  Why not right?  After all, I love to try out new software anyway!  Anyhow, it turned out that I loved both email clients.  In another word, I don’t mind using Thunderbird or Apple Mail for a long period of time, because either one will totally satisfy my email routine.

In my opinion, Apple Mail is somewhat slower than Thunderbird in retrieving new emails, but it might not be true since I’ve not yet heard of anyone else is complaining of the same thing.  Nonetheless, I think the latest Apple Mail in Mac OS X Lion is aesthetically more pleasing than the latest Thunderbird (i.e., Thunderbird 13.0.1), but not by much since I do like the layout of the latest Thunderbird too.  On the flip side, Thunderbird appears to be more intuitive in term of application functionalities, but you may disagree.  With that being said, Apple Mail isn’t hard to use at all, and it does a really good job at recognizing the remote settings so you can set up email accounts fast.  Such remote settings would be something as IMAP settings.  Let keep this comparison short, I think you will do very well in aggregating email accounts and emails into one email client application with either Thunderbird or Apple Mail (i.e., Apple Mail is for Mac only).

Today, Cnet’s “Mozilla calling it quits on Thunderbird, report says” article suggests that Mozilla may eventually fade out their support for Thunderbird.  The article also suggests that Mozilla is hoping that there will be an open source community with similar technical know-how will step up and take over the development of Thunderbird.  This means Mozilla is planning to cut back resources on improving Thunderbird, and Mozilla hopes that others who may not be as dedicated as Mozilla once was for developing Thunderbird to continue the development of Thunderbird.  Cnet suggests that Mozilla is trying to use their talent resource smarter by transferring the Thunderbird’s talent resource to other projects that Mozilla deems to be more important than Thunderbird.

Personally, I definitely feel sad to see Mozilla may cease their development of Thunderbird.  Nonetheless, I know Thunderbird is an excellent email client which many people have been using to aggregate their emails, and so I have great hope that Thunderbird will be taken under the wings of talented people or group of people — who have the knowledge on how to improve Thunderbird — well into the future.  The worst thing that may happen to Thunderbird is it will be outdated and people will not use it anymore as not that many developers want to improve the original features or develop newer ones for Thunderbird.  Let hope the worst possible scenario will not come too soon for a great email client Thunderbird!

Source:  http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57467973-93/mozilla-calling-it-quits-on-thunderbird-report-says/

Running Linux Mint 13 Onto MacBook Pro (Mid 2010 Model)

Linux Mint 13 On MacBook Pro

Linux Mint 13 On MacBook Pro

I was able to install Linux Mint 13 onto my MacBook Pro.  I had to say it was riveting to see my MacBook Pro booted into Linux Mint 13 for the first time.  How come?  Probably it was that I never had tried to install any Linux distribution onto a Mac before!  Anyhow, I thought it would be harder for me to install Linux Mint 13 than Windows onto a Mac, but it turned out I got it worked out perfectly the first time around.  Of course, I had used the correct guide, otherwise I would not be able to install Linux Mint 13 onto Mac after just one try.

I followed the Install Linux Mint 12 (Lisa) on 13inch MacBook Air 4.2 (2011 model) tutorial on billsdon.com blog, but I did not follow this tutorial by the letter.  I did not install and use rEFIt (i.e., preferring the use of the Mac’s option key on the keyboard to pick which operating system I want to boot into); I did not use GPT Fdisk to create 3 partitions for the hybrid MBR as I had only used it to create only 2 partitions — this prompted the warning about I had an extra partition that wasn’t used and GPT Fdisk asked about creating an extra partition in case I would be able to use this extra partition in the future for whatever purpose, but I refused to do so as I had read rodsbooks.com’s Hybrid MBRs: The Good, the Bad, and the So Ugly You’ll Tear Your Eyes Out article how it would be unwise to create an unrecognizable extra partition on Mac.  It appeared that Apple Disk Utility might have a bug that would prevent it to manipulate unknown MBR type codes, and by being careful about this I decidedly it would be wise to not create extra partition.  So, when GPT Fdisk asked me with this command prompt “Unused partition space(s) found. Use one to protect more partitions? (Y/N):,” I candidly replied N for no.

Here is the short version of how I had installed Linux Mint 13 onto Mac.

  1. Use Boot Camp Assistant (come with Mac by default) to create a second partition
  2. Download Linux Mint 13
  3. Burn Linux Mint 13 into a DVD
  4. Insert Linux Mint 13 into Mac’s DVD/CD tray
  5. Reboot Mac (Mac OS X Lion in my case)
  6. Hold down the option key (on the keyboard) right after hearing the chime (boot sound)
  7. Choose the DVD to boot into Linux Mint 13 Live DVD (not the Boot Camp or Mac OS X Lion partition)
  8. Wait for Linux 13 Live DVD to completely load into RAM (random access memory) and load itself up in a working stage
  9. Double click on the DVD icon (I think it labels as installing onto hard drive or something of this sort) that allows the installing of Linux Mint 13 onto Mac
  10. Follow the onscreen instruction to install Linux Mint 13, but I had to manually customize the partitions for Linux Mint 13 to make sure I that I would be able to pick the Linux Mint 13 partition (i.e., the root partition that represents by a backslash “/”) as a Bootloader, otherwise it would be a bad idea to install Linux Mint Bootloader into Mac’s main partition (i.e., you will not have a working Bootloader and won’t be able to boot into Linux Mint later as it would be installed into the wrong partition)
  11. Reboot into Mac and install GPT Fdisk software from the Internet
  12.  GPT Fdisk software is dangerous as it can totally destroy how Mac would boot up and will destroy Mac partitions if use it in the wrong way (i.e., will have to reinstall Mac and all data will be lost) — research on GPT Fdisk and how to use it correctly
  13. Use GPT Fdisk to create a hybrid MBR so when later I first boot into Linux Mint 13 on Mac, I won’t have to face the missing operating system warning
  14. Reboot Mac and hold down the option key (on keyboard) after hearing the chime
  15. Linux Mint 13 welcomes me on a Mac

Sources:

Apple Releases Mac OS X 10.7.4 To Fix Security Bugs

Mac OS X 10.7.4 Update Image From Vinh Nguyen's MacBook Pro

Mac OS X 10.7.4 Update Image From Vinh Nguyen’s MacBook Pro

Last couple days, people have been reported that there has been a bug in Mac OS X 10.7.3’s system-wide debug log file, consequently allowing anyone or any malicious program that knows where to look and have access to a Mac OS X 10.7.3 machine to steal users’ passwords.  It appears that the passwords are saved in plain text in Mac OS X 10.7.3 as the bug prevents the system from encrypting the passwords.  As people are panicking and wondering when will this bug be patched by Apple, Apple has quickly released Mac OS X 10.7.4 to address this password security bug.

Furthermore, this new update to Mac OS X 10.7.4 will also address other security bugs within Safari web browser.  Of course there are few other enhancements to other features too by updating to Mac OS X 10.7.4, but you can easily whisk over to Cnet’s Apple releases Safari 5.1.7, Snow Leopard updates, and more article for an in-depth look into Mac OS X 10.7.4 update.  So, don’t you hesitate to update your Mac to OS X 10.7.4, because your Mac will be more secure than before with the newer update.  To update your Mac to Mac OS X 10.7.4, just use the Software Update feature within Mac.  You can find Software Update feature if you left click on the Apple logo at the top left corner of the monitor/screen.

Sources:

Removing An App Which Appears Twice In Mac OS X Lion’s Launchpad

Screenshot of Launchpad was taken from Vinh Nguyen's Macbook Pro!

Screenshot of Launchpad was taken from Vinh Nguyen's Macbook Pro!

Mac OS X Lion’s Launchpad sometimes can be very buggy.  In my case, I saw an app appears twice in my Launchpad.  Nonetheless, this app could not be removed from Launchpad since it was downloaded and installed outside of the App Store.  So, even I had tried to refresh the Launchpad, the app refused to be removed from the Launchpad.  The whole idea of removing the app from Launchpad is to stop the app to appear twice in the Launchpad.  Once the app is removed from the Launchpad, one can always drag the same app back into Launchpad, but this time it won’t appear twice!  For those who are worrying that removing an app from Launchpad might actually uninstall the app, it’s not so!

Anyhow, enough with my ranting, and here is the solution.  You need to enter the command line (sqlite3 ~/Library/Application\ Support/Dock/*.db “DELETE from apps WHERE title=’APPNAME’;” && killall Dock) and replace the parameter where it says title=’APPNAME’ with the name of the app that you’ve wanted to remove.  So for an example, if you want to remove Spotify from Launchpad, you type in (sqlite3 ~/Library/Application\ Support/Dock/*.db “DELETE from apps WHERE title=’Spotify’;” && killall Dock).  Once you have done the removing of the app from the Launchpad, you might want to go back into Finder > Applications and drag the app you have removed from Launchpad back into Launchpad (i.e., appearing on the Dock).  Remember, doing this correctly, the same app won’t appear twice again inside your Launchpad.

Source:  http://osxdaily.com/2012/01/05/remove-apps-from-launchpad/

Hide Desktop Icons On Mac OS X Lion

Wanting to hide Mac OS X Lion’s Desktop icons?  I do, because I hate to have ugly Desktop!  Yes, Desktop supposes to be ugly, because the developers of the operating systems such as Mac OS X want users to be able to access whatever on Desktop within a click or two, replicating real life experience where people can get to things on their desk easily.  Then there are people like me who want to have a pretty Desktop!

Don’t listen to some people who advice you to install a kind of application that intends to hide Desktop icons, because it’s just so unnecessary.  In my honest opinion, having one more application that you may not trust to do something that Mac OS X itself allows users to do can be quite dangerous, don’t you think?  So, instead on relying on another application to hide Mac OS X Lion’s Desktop icons, we’re going to rely on command lines.

So, open up your terminal as a user that you want to hide the Dekstop icons for, and then type in the command:

  1. defaults write com.apple.finder CreateDesktop -bool false
  2. killall Finder (This second command is to apply change to the Desktop right away and so you don’t have to reboot your Mac OS X Lion to see the immediate effect of having to hide Desktop icons.)

To allow Mac OS X Lion’s Desktop to show icons again, just replace the first command with -bool true.

Source:  http://osxdaily.com/2009/09/23/hide-all-desktop-icons-in-mac-os-x/