Turning Local Dynamic IP Address Into A Local Static IP Address By Reserving It (Video)

A little diagram of an IP address (IPv4)

A little diagram of an IP address (IPv4) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What is local static IP address?  When someone talks about setting up a computer with a local static IP address, this person probably means to have a computer to use a local IP address that will not change.  Static means never change.

What is a local dynamic IP address?  It means a router will monitor the expiration dates of the leases of the local dynamic IP addresses which the router gave out to various computers within a network.  So when a computer uses a local dynamic IP address, sometime in the future a dynamic IP address will have its lease expired.  When this happens, a router will assign a new local dynamic IP address to this particular computer.  This means a dynamic IP address will have to change from time to time.

The benefits of having a local static IP address is that whenever a machine within a network is acting as a server of some sort, its local IP address remains the same as always.  This means if you had done a port forwarding for this particular machine, the port forwarding settings will not have to be changed.  This won’t be the case if you have a machine with a local dynamic IP address, because the local dynamic IP address will change and then the port forwarding settings too have to be reset so the router will know which local machine or server of some sort of which local IP address will be able to accept the port forwarding’s data.  So, it’s clear that using local IP addresses is best when you have machines that act as servers and so on.  Perhaps, a Time Machine server for doing backups for a Mac?

So, what is good about using local dynamic IP addresses?  The good thing about using local dynamic IP addresses is that once you set your computer to accept dynamic IP addresses in the network settings, you can move around the whole city or just about anywhere that hands out free Internet connection and not have to mess around with the network settings again.  What happens is that any public place that lets you tap into their network will probably assign your computer a local dynamic IP address.  Since your computer is set to accept a local dynamic IP address, you’re good to go.  You know, surfing the web and so on and not having to mess around with network settings.  If you’re already have your computer sets to use a local static IP address, it will be messy for you when you tap into a public Internet connection.  You will have to go into your network settings and then switch from static network settings to DHCP one.  After that, when you get back to your local network, you will have to re-enter all your local static IP settings into your network settings again so your computer will be able to use a local static IP address.

What if you want to have the benefit of not messing around with the network settings at all and allow the router of whatever network to do all the hard work by assigning you a local dynamic IP address whenever, and then you still keep the local static IP address settings when you get back into your local network?  How are you going to do just this?  Well, the answer is to reserve a local dynamic IP address.  When you reserve a local dynamic IP address, this particular local reserved dynamic IP address will always be assigned to the same machine.  So, in a sense, the router is always going to automatically assign a local static IP address for a particular machine.  So, in this sense, using local reserved dynamic IP address retains the same benefit of using a local dynamic IP address (i.e., the router will automatically do all the dirty work and you don’t have to mess with the network settings).  So, imagine this scenario.  You get to a Starbucks, get a latte, turn on your computer and then it will automatically accept a local dynamic IP address from the Starbucks’ router.  When you get back home, your local network will automatically assign your computer with the reserved local dynamic IP address.   This scenario allows you not to have to ever mess around with network settings once you have reserved a local dynamic IP address with your router.  Yet, a particular machine which you have reserved a local dynamic IP address for will have a local static IP address as this particular reserved local dynamic IP address will never change.

Just remember, when a router automatically assigns a local IP address, it’s doing its dynamic IP thing, and when you have to open up the network settings of your machine to add a static IP address manually, you’re doing static IP address thing.  Having reserved a local dynamic IP address, the router will do both dynamic and static IP things for you, letting you have more free time to do whatever.  Router will automatically assign a local dynamic IP address to your machine but this particular dynamic IP address will never change.  Anyhow, I hope you get it.

Within the video above, you get to see me showing you how to add a local reserved dynamic IP address so you can use it as a local static IP address for your machine.  Enjoy!!!

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Using VPN To Access All Local Services Without The Need To Open Up Unnecessary Inbound Ports

Before knowing much about VPN, I usually opened up many inbound ports for my computer firewall and the firewall that resided within the router so remote services such as APF (Apple Time Machine) would function correctly.  Obviously, these remote services (e.g., APF, FTP, CIFS, etc…) are also accessible within local area network, therefore one does not need to have to be outside a local area network to use these remote services.  For an example, one can just sit next to the APF server (i.e., APF which hosts on a network attached storage) and locally backup one’s Mac to the Time Machine service.  When using such services locally, one has to use local IP addresses, because one  is within a local area network (e.g., home network, office network, etc…).

The idea is to open up less ports to protect everything within a local area network better.  So, when one travels abroad, one cannot use local IP addresses to access one’s remote services (e.g., APF, FTP, CIFS, etc…), and one has to open up ports for these remote services so remote access would be possible.  Since one has to open up inbound ports for remote connections, one’s local area network might become more vulnerable.  The more open ports there are, the more exploits that hackers can use to test or attack against the services that rely on the open ports.

Luckily, we have VPN.  VPN stands for Virtual Private Network.  Big companies love to deploy VPN for their employees.  If you have ever met one of those employees from one of those big companies, you might see this person logins into a VPN network through a laptop when this person is away from the company.  Since big companies are using VPN, VPN must be for the elites only right?  Wrong!  Just about anyone can use VPN to protect oneself, and it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to do so.  If you watch other videos of mine within my YouTube channel, you will see how easy it’s to set up VPN server/service on Windows 8.  Anyhow, the whole idea is to open up less ports for a network so everything within a network can be somewhat more secure.

Using VPN, one can access local area network as if one never leaves local area network all along.  For an example, one can sit at a Starbucks and yet connect to remote services(e.g., APF, CIFS, FTP, SSH, etc…) with local IP addresses.  How is this possible?  Like I said, using VPN, one never leaves local area network!  This is why VPN is definitely a better option than just opening up whatever inbound ports there are for different remote services.  With VPN, all one has to do is to open up one port which VPN relies on.  Through the connection of VPN, one then can just access all services within a local area network as if one has never leave a local area network all along.  In case you don’t know, VPN encrypts data automatically.  This is just another reason why I think VPN is definitely a better solution for remote access.

Gigabit LAN Empowers Productivity Such As Running Virtual Machines On A Network Attached Storage’s iSCSI

English: Intel Pro/1000 GT Gigabit Ethernet PC...

English: Intel Pro/1000 GT Gigabit Ethernet PCI Network card (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you’re on a Gigabit LAN (Local Area Network), then you can do so many things that sometimes the extra efforts seem to be so redundant, but that is the whole idea!!!  For an instance, on my Gigabit LAN, I had installed Fedora 16 virtual machine (VirtualBox type) onto FreeNAS box (my home Network Attached Storage server), but accessing this virtual machine from my other home computers.  This way, I can centralize whatever virtual machines I have had in one location, and yet I’m able to access these virtual machines anywhere (i.e., any local computer which has VirtualBox installed).  To run a virtual machine on FreeNAS box, I set up iSCSI and installed a virtual machine (using VirtualBox) on iSCSI drive (iSCSI ZFS dataset volume).

I wonder… what happen if two local computers access the same virtual machine at the same time?  Probably something bad might happen.  I don’t think there will be a problem for two local computers access the same virtual machine at different time.  Nonetheless, why don’t you try this out and let me know, OK?

Other examples of how I have used a Gigabit LAN are doing backups for Windows 7, Macs, and other computers to FreeNAS box (e.g., CIFS, AFP).  Without a Gigabit LAN, doing the many things I had mentioned previously would be tedious and slow.  A Gigabit LAN pushes data ten to 40 times faster (at least that is how I feel) than slower types of LAN.

Getting Gigabit LAN going for your home isn’t hard at all!  The requirements are, CAT6 cable, a Gigabit NIC (Network Interface Card), and a Gigabit router.  That’s all you really need for having a Gigabit LAN going.  I wish I can say more as if I’m very sophisticated, but there isn’t much more to say of how getting a Gigabit LAN going.

Nowadays, CAT6 cable isn’t expensive anymore.  For an example, I looked on Amazon and saw a 50 feet CAT6 cable costed only $3.45.  The same inexpensive story goes for Gigabit NIC.  I saw a PCI-E Gigabit NIC priced around $32 on Amazon.  Gigabit router is probably the most expensive item you have to get before you can have a Gigabit LAN going.  I saw a Gigabit wireless router priced around $72 on Amazon, but few reviewers said this router had overheating problem.  You definitely need to get a good Gigabit router which has few problems or else you might not get even close to the advertised Gigabit speed.