How To Check Temperatures For CPUs And NVidia Graphic Card On Linux Mint 14

Within the video right after the break, I briefly talk about how to check the temperatures of CPUs and NVidia graphic card on Linux Mint 14.  Enjoy!!!

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Running Linux Mint 13 Onto MacBook Pro (Mid 2010 Model)

Linux Mint 13 On MacBook Pro

Linux Mint 13 On MacBook Pro

I was able to install Linux Mint 13 onto my MacBook Pro.  I had to say it was riveting to see my MacBook Pro booted into Linux Mint 13 for the first time.  How come?  Probably it was that I never had tried to install any Linux distribution onto a Mac before!  Anyhow, I thought it would be harder for me to install Linux Mint 13 than Windows onto a Mac, but it turned out I got it worked out perfectly the first time around.  Of course, I had used the correct guide, otherwise I would not be able to install Linux Mint 13 onto Mac after just one try.

I followed the Install Linux Mint 12 (Lisa) on 13inch MacBook Air 4.2 (2011 model) tutorial on billsdon.com blog, but I did not follow this tutorial by the letter.  I did not install and use rEFIt (i.e., preferring the use of the Mac’s option key on the keyboard to pick which operating system I want to boot into); I did not use GPT Fdisk to create 3 partitions for the hybrid MBR as I had only used it to create only 2 partitions — this prompted the warning about I had an extra partition that wasn’t used and GPT Fdisk asked about creating an extra partition in case I would be able to use this extra partition in the future for whatever purpose, but I refused to do so as I had read rodsbooks.com’s Hybrid MBRs: The Good, the Bad, and the So Ugly You’ll Tear Your Eyes Out article how it would be unwise to create an unrecognizable extra partition on Mac.  It appeared that Apple Disk Utility might have a bug that would prevent it to manipulate unknown MBR type codes, and by being careful about this I decidedly it would be wise to not create extra partition.  So, when GPT Fdisk asked me with this command prompt “Unused partition space(s) found. Use one to protect more partitions? (Y/N):,” I candidly replied N for no.

Here is the short version of how I had installed Linux Mint 13 onto Mac.

  1. Use Boot Camp Assistant (come with Mac by default) to create a second partition
  2. Download Linux Mint 13
  3. Burn Linux Mint 13 into a DVD
  4. Insert Linux Mint 13 into Mac’s DVD/CD tray
  5. Reboot Mac (Mac OS X Lion in my case)
  6. Hold down the option key (on the keyboard) right after hearing the chime (boot sound)
  7. Choose the DVD to boot into Linux Mint 13 Live DVD (not the Boot Camp or Mac OS X Lion partition)
  8. Wait for Linux 13 Live DVD to completely load into RAM (random access memory) and load itself up in a working stage
  9. Double click on the DVD icon (I think it labels as installing onto hard drive or something of this sort) that allows the installing of Linux Mint 13 onto Mac
  10. Follow the onscreen instruction to install Linux Mint 13, but I had to manually customize the partitions for Linux Mint 13 to make sure I that I would be able to pick the Linux Mint 13 partition (i.e., the root partition that represents by a backslash “/”) as a Bootloader, otherwise it would be a bad idea to install Linux Mint Bootloader into Mac’s main partition (i.e., you will not have a working Bootloader and won’t be able to boot into Linux Mint later as it would be installed into the wrong partition)
  11. Reboot into Mac and install GPT Fdisk software from the Internet
  12.  GPT Fdisk software is dangerous as it can totally destroy how Mac would boot up and will destroy Mac partitions if use it in the wrong way (i.e., will have to reinstall Mac and all data will be lost) — research on GPT Fdisk and how to use it correctly
  13. Use GPT Fdisk to create a hybrid MBR so when later I first boot into Linux Mint 13 on Mac, I won’t have to face the missing operating system warning
  14. Reboot Mac and hold down the option key (on keyboard) after hearing the chime
  15. Linux Mint 13 welcomes me on a Mac

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