Let Run VPN Server On Windows 8 To Allow You Securely Transmit Data At Any Public Place Which Relies On A Public Internet Connection

Using VPN (Virtual Private Network), one can securely transmit data back and forth in a public place which relies on a public Internet connection.  Wait, what is a public Internet connection?  It’s just an Internet connection in which just about anyone who has a computer can tap into and use.  A good example would be at a Starbucks.  Transmitting data in a public location is a very dangerous thing to do (i.e., only if you’re connecting to the public Internet connection), because you never know someone might do something nefarious nearby.  He or she might sniff the network traffics, and this means anything you transmit through a public Internet connection can be intercepted by such a person.  With VPN, it will be a lot harder for such an evildoer to actually get hold of your data in a public place.

Why using VPN can safeguard your data better when you’re connecting to a public Internet connection?  VPN will create a safe connection between your computer and a VPN server, and whatever gets transmitted through a VPN connection will be encrypted.  Nonetheless, VPN isn’t an end to end encrypted connection.  What this means is that when your data leaves VPN server so it can go to a server which hosts the web service on the Internet, the data will become unencrypted.  How come?  The Internet isn’t opening up an encrypted channel with your VPN server!  To put this in another way, it’s only the computer which you use to connect to a VPN server can actually open up an encrypted channel with the VPN server.  This is why you need a VPN client.  Nowadays, you don’t have to install VPN client much, because most operating systems (i.e., Linux, Mac OS X, Windows) come with a VPN client by default.  You might have to install a VPN client if you’re connecting to a non-standard, third party VPN server/service.

You can imagine the VPN encrypted channel as in a VPN tunnel or just a tunnel where cars travel through.  When a car got out of a tunnel, the daylight will hit the car in every direction.  Got the gist?

VPN is definitely a good thing to have when you are using the Internet in a public location.  Even though VPN isn’t an end to end encrypted connection, it’s still going to prevent the hackers in a public location from hacking you.  Of course, he or she can try, but it won’t be easy!  Let say, the hacker cannot magically insert himself or herself between the VPN server and the web service (which locates somewhere on the Internet and you want to connect to).  If the hacker wants to hack you in a public spot when you’re using VPN, he or she must hack your VPN connection first, and then everything else would be secondary.

To be even more secure, you can totally transmit all data within HTTPS protocol (a secure/encrypted hypertext transfer protocol), and this way the hacker is going to work even harder.  This means, a hacker must first hack your VPN connection, and then your HTTPS connection afterward.  VPN connection itself is already a difficult thing to tamper with.

Right after the break, you can check out a video I made on how to allow Windows 8 to host a VPN server/service.  Running a VPN server/service on Windows 8 allows you to go just about anywhere and connect back home for a VPN connection.  Of course, if your home network isn’t secure and already being infected with hackers’ exploits, then your VPN connection might as well be rendered insecure.  So, make sure your home network is actually well guarded.  A well guarded home network will definitely ensure your home devices such as a Windows 8 computer — which runs VPN server — won’t be tampered with.  I think a well guarded network equates to deploying all security elements within a network, and this means something as a strong firewall, strong antivirus software, strong network security policies, and the list would go on.

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Amazing Google Fiber Pricing Plans Made Known By Google; Kansas City Will Experience 100 Times Faster Internet Connection!!!

A view of Kansas City, Missouri

A view of Kansas City, Missouri (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Google has been hard at work in bringing the Internet connection that is 100 time faster than the traditional Internet connections to Kansas City, Missouri.  Such traditional Internet connections are DSL, Cable, and the likes.  Anyhow, Reuters just reported that Google just revealed the pricing plans for its super fast fiber Internet service.  I cannot believe how awesome the pricing plans are!!!  OK, if you live in Kansas City and want to have 1000 Megabit per second download speed or you can say 1 Gigabit per second download speed for the Internet connection in conjunction with TV package of major broadcast networks, then you have to pay around $120 per month.  It gets better!  Now, let say you don’t want to have the TV package, you only have to pay $70 per month for the Internet connection which has 1 Gigabit per second download speed.  TheVerge reported that Google Fiber Internet upload speed is also 1000 Mb/s (or 1 Gigabit per second).

Just for a comparison, I’m paying roughly around $50 for 24 Mb/s down and 3 Mb/s up, but the people in Kansas City only have to pay $20 more to get 1000 Mb/s down and 1000 Mb/s up.  I think I like Kansas City better!!!  Anyhow, check out the Google Fiber Internet’s “Let Do This For Kansas City video right after the break.”  Enjoy!!!

Update:  To make you cringe even more at your current Internet Service Provider, Google gives away Nexus 7 as a free TV remote control for Kansas City dwellers who pay $120 Google Fiber plan.  (TheVerge reported — Nexus 7 bundled free with Google Fiber TV as default remote control.)

Bandwidth Cap Is Bad For Data In The Cloud

English: Diagram showing three main types of c...

Image via Wikipedia

We know data in the cloud might be a good idea, but there are few hesitations come to mind that make data in the cloud a good idea but not practical.  We know data in the cloud might be subjected to security risk, losing one’s right to data (you never know), and bandwidth limitation!  The other two are obvious, but let me focus on the last which is even more obvious.  Yes, bandwidth is what making data in the cloud for average users a good idea but not practical.  Home users, not enterprise users, are facing data caps from their ISPs.  Many ISPs are so gung-ho in capping home users’ bandwidth around 100 Gigabyte to 250 Gigabyte range.  Sure, 100 GB to 250 GB range sounds like a lot, but believe me it’s not if home users decide to backup their huge 650 GB to 2 Terabyte worth of data onto the cloud!  It’s now obvious that data in the cloud is simply not a computing tool/solution for everyday folks, isn’t it?