$30,000 Gaming PC For 7 Gamers To Play 7 Different Games At The Same Time

I’m so jealous if you have a PC rig that could run 7 graphics intensive games at the same time.  Ooops, I’m already so jealous, because LinusTechTips had just built one.  Check it out right after the break, because it’s beautiful.  Pure awesomeness!  The cost though, it will cost you an arm or a leg or a car just to get this beautiful baby going.  It’s around $30,000!

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OnePlus One Personal Experience After Using It For 3 Days (Ultra HD)

Just adding a video on YouTube to describe how I felt personally about using OnePlus One after 3 days.  The video is shaky since I’d rarely ever used a smartphone for recording videos, and so I didn’t anticipate for the footage to be so shaky.  The footage I’d taken with OnePlus One is raw; meaning I didn’t use Photoshop or any other video quality enhancement feature to make the footage looks better.  I want the footage to be pristine  just like how it got captured without being edited, showing the real quality of the hardware that I used to capture the footage.  Nonetheless, since the video is way too shaky for normal viewing, and so I had to use a stabilizer feature which came with my video editing software to somewhat stabilize the shaky footage.  In the future, if I’m ever going to do another video recording session with a smartphone, I’ll definitely put more effort in anchoring myself so the footage won’t be too shaky.  Anyhow, check out the video right after the break.  Enjoy!!!

OnePlus One Review (Mobile – Smartphone)

I just got my hands on OnePlus One smartphone from OnePlus, and I’m a very happy man.  Basically, I’d pre-ordered OnePlus One smartphone like a week and half ago, and now I got it.  Check out the short review video I’d made for this awesome smartphone right after the break.  Enjoy!!!

Wanting to know how to apply a screen protector to your smartphone such as OnePlus One?  Check out the YouTube video I found on YouTube which shows you how to do just this right after the break.  Enjoy!!!

Easily Upgrade ASUS Desktop’s BIOS With ASUS Software Manager

Have you purchased an ASUS desktop lately?  In case an ASUS desktop’s model you have does work with ASUS manager software, then you’re in luck.  I’ve found out that it’s very easy for you to upgrade your ASUS’s desktop BIOS with ASUS manager software.  Basically, you can visit ASUS’s official website, download the latest BIOS, use ASUS manager software to locate the BIOS you had downloaded, and just let the ASUS manager upgrades the BIOS.  Of course, just make sure you don’t turn off your ASUS desktop or play with it during the BIOS upgrade, because your system can become very unstable if you do such things.

Just a caution, you should not upgrade your ASUS desktop’s BIOS or any computer BIOS unless you have a very good reason to.  It’s not wise to mess with a BIOS, because you are doing some major change to your computer system and you’re taking a great risk of breaking your system big time.  Nonetheless, it’s a given when your computer system isn’t functioning as it supposes to be, maybe the latest BIOS is the antidote to your system’s sickness.  Also, make sure you does download the original BIOS and make a backup of it on an external hard drive or a thumb drive just in case that the new/latest BIOS might be a worser problem than the original BIOS.  Some computer manufacturers may not allow you to download the original BIOS but only the latest or near latest BIOS, then you are taking a great risk in upgrading your BIOS, hence you might not be able to make a rollback to the original BIOS.

Since Windows 8.1 came out, some ASUS models might experience driver problems.  For an example, 8821AE (802.11ac) wireless network card is the wireless NIC for my ASUS desktop/PC, but it got a really bad attitude for Windows 8.1.  Instead of working correctly, it would cause Blue Screen of Death on Windows 8.1 and slow down the flow of network traffic that got streamed.  Even right after I had upgraded the 8821AE wireless NIC to its latest driver, the problem persisted.  Only right after I used ASUS manager software to easily upgrade the BIOS to the latest BIOS that the latest driver for 8821AE wireless NIC would function correctly.  Now, I could stream movies and transfer data at 802.11ac, real world, data rate (i.e., not at a marketing or lab measure rate) without a problem.  So, in case you got an ASUS desktop/PC and experiencing Windows 8.1 driver problems, you might want to consider of upgrading the drivers to the latest drivers first before thinking of an even more drastic action such as upgrading the BIOS.

Using External Device As A Share Drive Or Backup Drive For Your QNAP Server

In the video right after the break, I talk about how to use an external device as a share drive or a backup drive for your QNAP server.  On a side note, I think this is a great way to enable USB 3.0 capability for a computer that doesn’t have the motherboard that can support the USB 3.0 adapter.  Keep in mind, if you have a QNAP server that supports USB 3.0 ports, it’s like you have USB 3.0 capability on your local computer.  Basically, you can always tap into the QNAP server’s share drive and tell it to behave as if it’s just another external hard drive on your computer.  Obviously this share drive which is connecting to your QNAP server is using USB 3.0 port, and hence this is why you can enable USB 3.0 capability for your local computer.  This is a stupid reason for you to just go out and buy QNAP server and external hard drive that support USB 3.0 ports, because you can just buy another computer which supports USB 3.0 ports.  Nonetheless, you can definitely take advantage of this beneficial side effect of having a QNAP server as a network attached storage server.  Same story with eSATA capability if your QNAP server supports eSATA ports.  Enjoy the video!!!

Let’s Get Our Groove On With External Graphic Power

video_card

video_card (Photo credit: marklinkphoto)

In the video right after the break, a guy demonstrated that he could use external graphic card to run games on MacBook Air with frame rate per second hovered around 90 frames per second.  The trick is that he used Thunderbolt and his external graphic card rig.  My imagination is now feeling tickled!  Does this mean if we try and things are right we might be able to hook up a humongous box with — only — few dozens of external graphic cards within so we can do just about anything graphic intensive?  Such a graphic card box will run hot of course, but with proper cooling everything will be alright.  Furthermore, when you can externally partition graphic power from CPU power, it means you can have the graphic power be stationary everywhere, and all you need is your mobile devices to be on the go.  I wonder, if the Internet connection can be just as fast as Thunderbolt, will graphic power go streaming in real time across the Internet tubes?  Anyhow, the YouTube video is right after the break.  Enjoy it!!!

Afterthought:  Wouldn’t it be awesome if virtual computers (virtualization of computing power) could tap into the full potential of the external graphic power?  In this sort of case, the virtualization of computing does not need to mimic the video graphic card hardware, but just tap into the graphic power directly.  This will unleash cheap computing furthermore.  You can basically run a bunch of different operating systems on one machine through the virtualization of computing with true graphic power.  I think this will be super super cool!!!