Could Saturn’s Rings Were Made By UFO?

I don’t think I can claim that I’d seen a real UFO as in an alien craft from outer space, but I think what I’d seen once was something that I could not describe since it flew too fast and appeared to be an orange or red ball that flew way too fast for any modern craft to do so.  It hovered like for a few seconds to the left of the tree line and then it flew in a strangest way and disappeared real fast behind the tree line, and that was around 9:00 or 10:00 PM or so, because I don’t remember the exact time.  I know it was night time for sure.  This is why I remember it was so bright, but I could not remember the exact color of the unidentified object.  Anyhow, so nowadays when an incredible person with incredible background in science or reputable field claimed that he or she had seen a UFO, I wouldn’t disregard his or her claim immediately.  After all, my experience was rather strange too.

Dr. Norman Bergrun, author of Ringmakers of Saturn, claimed that he believed the rings around Saturn are stuffs that were created by the aliens.  I could be wrong on what I just stated, because I couldn’t find much information about Dr. Norman Bergrun.  I tried to find a wikipedia page of the man, but I couldn’t find any.  Nonetheless, on Amazon, a book under the title Ringmakers of Saturn is available for purchase, and the author of the book is indeed Norman Bergrun.  Anyhow, I’ve found that it’s interesting how Dr. Norman Bergrun thought that the rings weren’t naturally formed by Saturn and the spatial environment around Saturn.

Furthermore, the article Cassini Finds ‘Nothing’ in Saturn’s Ring Gap on astroengine.com digs into how scientists studied the data that Cassini found in regarding to the space between the rings and Saturn was a big empty.  This confound the scientists as they thought there should be more space dust between the rings and the Saturn itself.  This mystery of Saturn’s rings makes me wonder could Dr. Norman Bergrun has been onto something all along.  Anyhow, check out a YouTube video right after the break where Dr. Norman Bergrun talks on why he thinks Saturn’s rings aren’t natural.

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That Poetical Sense In The Night (Book Publishing)

I started out writing poetry in my spare time for fun since March of 2013. Since July of 2014 I began to take note of my extensive poetry collection, and so I decided to create a book for my poems. This very book, “That Poetical Sense In The Night,” is the result of my spare time poetry writing. The title of this book is from one of those very early poems that I’d written in March of 2013. The book started out with the latest poem that I’d written working toward to the end of the book in which my earliest poem would be inscribed therein. I’d written my poems according to my feeling at specific moments in time, and so many of my poems were written in free verse. Nonetheless, in some of these poetical moments I did manage to have form my poems in various poetical forms. My poems depict from humanity to eureka moment, and so I think my poems do cover a wide area of things.

Now you can get this poetry book of mine at Amazon’s Kindle Store.

 

Book Exclusivity Trend Might Be The New Rise Of Book Publishing, But It Might Be Expensive For Customers To Buy eBooks

English: TCU's Barnes and Noble Bookstore.

Image via Wikipedia

Engadget’s Barnes & Noble to pull Amazon Publishing titles from shelves over exclusivity concerns article suggests Barnes & Noble has turned up the heat as the two go on competing each other for a book market domination.  Of course, Barnes & Noble is worrying that Amazon will eventually kick them out of their own game.  Meanwhile, Amazon continues to do the impossible even though Amazon is relatively new player in the book world when one compares Amazon against Barnes & Noble.  Seniority doesn’t secure a permanent establishment since we have seen how Borders had filed for bankruptcy from Chapter 11 which eventually turned into Chapter 7 (Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borders_Group).  The argument which Barnes & Noble has against Amazon is clear to me, but might not be true since I’m not an expert in the operation of the book business, is that Amazon is too pushy in term of demanding for more exclusivity with various book publishers.  I have to wonder though, would this be a good thing for book publishers?

Why?  If book publishers can negotiate with particular distributors for exclusivity deal, it might in the end raising the value of the book publishers who go for exclusive deals since exclusivity means rarity.  We know most things that are rare might be more valuable, right?  What if we take a look at a much bigger picture, how would the book world fare if only big players such as Amazon would be able to acquire exclusivities from popular book publishing companies?  I’m not sure but I think with more exclusive deals go around the book world, book business might change even more than it’s already has.

The book world already has changed so much in term of how ebook technology has totally changed how consumers read their books, pushing more consumers only to buy ebooks and abandon their traditional books (i.e., books made of papers).  Exclusive deals within the book world might push the change further by having small book stores to go out of business.  These small book stores usually are local book stores.  Of course, the trend seems to head in this particular route anyway since ebook technology has made it so easy for consumers to buy books online.  It means people don’t really have to go to a local book store to buy their books.

To knit the fragments of the big picture together, in my opinion, the trend of pushing for exclusivity isn’t meant the death of book publishing, but it might be the new rise of book publishing.  If Barnes & Noble wants to beat Amazon in book publishing exclusivity trend, I think Barnes & Noble has to figure out how to offer the book publishing companies better deals than what Amazon is currently offering these book publishing companies.

Will the consumers be beneficial to book exclusivity trend?  Probably not in the long run, because I think once a giant book distributor has began to dominate the book exclusivity trend, such entity tends to raise the prices of the books since the competitors aren’t going to have such titles for sale anyway.  The outlook might not be good for book customers if the Amazon defeats Barnes & Noble in book exclusivity trend, because one less competitor will give one less reason for Amazon to sell ebooks at the cheapest prices as possible.  Of course, my speculation on this might not pan out the way I speculate at all, because I’m not an expert in book business anyway.  I guess you just have to take my words with a grain of salt!

When Electricity Isn’t So Accessible, Literature Thrives On With Books Made Of Papers

Reading the title of an article’s “Ebooks don’t spell the end of literature,” a lightbulb lighted up in my head — a new title of a new article came to life “When Electricity Isn’t So Accessible, Literature Thrives On With Books Made Of Papers.”  OK, it does sound like I’m a hater of ebooks and ereaders, but I’m not.  I actually own an iPad 2, Kindle, and an iPhone 4 — each of these devices can allow me to read ebooks.  Unfortunately, only Kindle can allow me to read ebooks more frequently and without worrying of the situation where battery goes dead.  It’s all because Kindle uses E-ink technology which can conserve battery power better than the full colored back lid screens of iPad 2 and iPhone 4.

With that many ebook enabled devices, I think I’ve established myself as a person who does have the ability to read ebooks whenever he wants, and often I find myself adding more ebooks into my already large collection of ebooks through the means of buying ebooks from Amazon and borrowing ebooks from local libraries’ digital collections.  The point that I’m trying to make is that electronic devices such as ereaders can become useless when electricity becomes inaccessible.  It’s a simple point, but it’s often overlooked by onlookers who do not know the tormented feeling of the ones who have to face such condition.  Sure, it’s not like a life threatening situation, but it’s the truth.  Just like how Marta Hillers had described electronic devices as useless and people became cave dwellers in her book “A Woman in Berlin.”  It was her recognition of when electricity became scarce, electronic devices could be only empty shells of anything but useful.

OK, it does sound as if my argument is rather weak, because it sounds as if we need to have a World War II again and to have people experience the lack of electricity as how Marta Hillers had so we can realize the merit of not totally relying on ereaders; I disagree!  How do we know electricity will always be abundant?  I don’t think even the future that we’re imagining of when there will be free electricity in abundant amount (i.e., always available) through the usages of futuristic solar and wind technologies — guaranteeing there won’t be a day that people might become cave dwellers again — can last forever.  Who can guarantee that there will never be a breakdown in society to a point that humans become cave dwellers?

Whenever I read something that put ereaders and ebooks above traditional books (i.e., books made from trees), I have to say let not be so optimistic about such aspect.  I rather encourage people to believe in having both for a long time to come as a better approach to ensure books don’t go the way of book burnings in ancient times.  And yet, books should go the way of the dead sea scrolls.  Having both you ask?  Sure, having both means let print more traditional books and release more ebooks (in effect sell more ereaders), and to larger effect let people have more choices of choosing their reading medium.  What not to do is to promote ebooks and ereaders only society and abandon the traditional book society (i.e., books made from trees).

Lastly, I like to think that censoring ebooks (i.e., digital forms) is way easier than traditional books (i.e., books made from trees).  How?  It takes few entities and few keystrokes on keyboards to eliminate huge databases of ebooks and the data themselves.  What cool about books made from trees is that you have to burn them physically which speaks more to why it’s bad to burn books.  You can say the Hollywood effect of having real books on fire might connect to scholars more than not, in negative way of course.

Afterthought:  I do like ebooks as more trees can be saved by not printing books made of papers, but we humans can always print books made of papers ethically.  That is, we do not really have to destroy a whole forest for printing traditional books (i.e., books made from trees), because we do have a choice of printing less of the same books in term of copies; we know that a single ebook can be easily download and copy in digital forms without worrying about destroying a forest.

True, iPad 2 Is More Important Than Any Book; Untrue, Nobody Care About Physical Books!

Apple is invading schools.  After all, kids will be our future leaders.  It’s best to have them think that iPad 2 is the only tool that the future leaders need to use for futuristic agenda.  OK, maybe it’s a plausible propaganda for a commercial company so it can sell more products for a long time to come, but it’s also a fashion statement that nowadays, even a school superintendent seems to think so that iPad 2 is more important than a book.  According to Cnet, superintendent Tom Morill of Auburn schools in Maine has declared that iPad 2 is more important than a book.

True, digital book readers such as iPad 2 and Kindle are so much more capable than any book!  These digital readers can access millions of books, and nobody needs a backpack to carry all the books of the world around when one just needs to leisurely stroll in the park with an iPad 2 in left or right palm.  Untrue, digital book readers will replace physical books in a sense that nobody wants to print any physical book anymore.  I think physical books probably are still the best way to keep information around much much longer.  For an example, nobody has to depend on a corporation to have certain books around for centuries to come, because nobody can be sure such a corporation is still profitable in centuries to come.  When a corporation that is responsible for storing digital ebooks is out of business, we have to hope that someone else is going to take up that responsibility or else those ebooks won’t be accessible even iPad 2 is awesome.  In the case of physical books, people will always have them somewhere, probably collecting dusts in the attics or basements.

Just like a television age had never successfully putting out radio business, because people like choices.  I’m all for iPad 2 and Kindle and more, but I want to know that physical books are going to be printed, still.  Two words, more choices!  Perhaps, libraries that carries both versions (i.e., physical and digital) are best comfort for all of us who love books.  So we all know that we can always run out to a library for any form of books.

There is no argument there against what the superintendent Tom Morill has declared, but we should argue to save a place within our hearts for physical books.  Maybe one day, a fictional disaster may materialize such as a virus has wiped out all digital ebooks in the world, and the only books left are the physical ones that have been collecting dusts in a long forgotten section of certain rundown libraries.  Such a scenario is farfetched, but I bring this up to remind us nothing in this world is impossible!  We made to the moon, didn’t we?

http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/.element/apps/cvp/3.0/swf/cnn_416x234_embed.swf?context=embed&videoId=us/2011/04/08/dnt.me.ipad.kindergarten.wgme

Source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17852_3-20052512-71.html?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-20