Connect PS3 Controller As Xbox 360 Controller On Windows 10

DS3 Tool from MotioninJoy and Better DS3 are no longer working out for me when I’m using PS3 controller to play video games on Windows 10.  I’m running Windows 10 Preview Build 10159.  Previous Windows 10 Build would work with DS3 Tool though.  Anyhow, and so I had to find another way to make my PS3 controller works with Windows 10.  Luckily, now I’ve found out a way to do so.  Basically, as how I would use DS3 Tool to make PS3 maps to Xbox 360 controller layout for playing game, the trick which I reveal in the video is going to allow you to do pretty much the same thing.  Except for one thing, you cannot customize the mapping of Xbox 360 controller, but you just have to let the driver automatically maps all the Xbox 360 controller’s buttons and sticks to the PS3 controller.  Hopefully, if you need something like this, my video is helpful to you.  Enjoy!!!

A Solution To Cannot Access Network Shares On Windows 10 Preview

I’ve been testing Windows 10 Preview version out lately.  So far, I think the graphical user interface of Windows 10 is definitely an upgrade over all previous Windows versions.  Let me simply put, I like Windows 10 overall look!  Of course I’ve been encountering several bugs since I’m using Windows 10 Preview version, and within this blog post I want to address one specific bug that has gotten me so annoyed lately.

If you set up PIN as your log-in password for Windows 10 Preview (version 10147 and previous versions), then after next log-in session your network shares will not be accessible.  Even you have already mapped a network drive, it will be disconnected and unavailable for the next log-in.  Rebooting computer won’t help!

The solution is to reset the PIN, but don’t create new PIN!  If you reset the PIN, it will ask you to create new PIN.  If you refuse to create new PIN, then the PIN won’t be available as password log-in method.  Once you have done this, you can use the Picture log-in method and other log-in methods, except for PIN log-in method, to log into your Windows 10.  Once you access your Windows 10 after the abandonment of PIN log-in method, you will notice that now you can access network shares.

Good luck to you!  For now, I like to end this post here.  Of course, I’m going to try to play around with Windows 10 Preview version and whatever Preview version that will come out later, and I’ll write up some more about my experience with Windows 10.  For now, let’s say I’m still experimenting with Windows 10 Preview version 10147.

Keyboard Failure On Boot, Clearing CMOS Is A Possible Panacea

I got a scare today!  My computer’s motherboard can sometimes be very unfriendly.  What had happened was that I turned off my computer while the Mobo was trying to boot up the BIOS, and this was when I got the scare as the Mobo would spit out keyboard failure error on the next boot up.  I’m telling you this, if you never have had experience this with your computer, you would not know the panic and frustration of this scare!  Keyboard failure error on boot would not allow you to use your keyboard at all to bypass the black error screen stage even though the screen would encourage you to press F1 or F2 to get pass it.  Trust me, I had tried to press just about anything on the keyboard to have a try at getting pass this scary black screen of death, but nothing would work!

Naturally, I went into instinctive mode by switching out the USB port for the keyboard’s USB connector, but this was a futile effort.  I watched a YouTube video that suggested of pressing F1 really fast till at certain point and then holding down F1 till certain point on boot up to get pass the black screen of death, but this method just did not do it for me.

Consequentially, I got physical with the Mobo by accessing it physically!  Don’t worry, the Mobo is fine, because I did not punch or kick it.  Anyhow,  what I did was clearing CMOS using the jumper on the Mobo.  I don’t know about your Mobo, but mine came with 2 jumpers.  The first jumper got 2 slots to slip onto 2 pins of the first three pins jumper group, and the second jumper got 2 slots also to slip onto the 2 pins of the last three pins jumper group.  In my case, I had to remove the first jumper physically from the first three pins group and slip the jumper onto the first and second pins of the first three pins group.  Right after, I repositioned the graphics card and what not so the computer would run normally as before, I powered my computer back on.  Of course, nothing would happen, because the jumper wasn’t in the right position for anything to work, and so I had to remove and reposition the jumper to the second and third pins of the first three pins jumper group.  Once again, the pain of reaching the jumper slots meant I had to remove the graphics card from its slot, but the inconvenience was unavoidable.  Unfortunately, even after clearing the CMOS with the jumper, my Mobo was still spitting out the keyboard failure error on boot.  Back to square one!

Onto the second method of clearing CMOS, I removed the CMOS battery from the Mobo for at least thirty minutes.  Afterward, I repositioned the CMOS battery and rebooted the computer.  Unfortunately, even this would not get me pass the black screen of death!  Naturally, I thought that my computer was done for!

Fortunately, after the second try of clearing the CMOS with the motherboard’s first three pins jumper/group, the computer was finally booted pass the black screen of death.  Windows is now booting up just fine as the result, and I’m able to use the keyboard just fine.  Everything else works just fine also!  The scare is finally over!

In summary, clearing the CMOS should be your last resort to fix most BIOS related failure errors on boot!  Of course, even clearing the CMOS sometimes won’t get your computer going again, because your computer’s motherboard might be done for at this stage for whatever reasons!  Another possibility is that the CMOS battery could have died on you and need a replacement before clearing the CMOS would actually work as intended!  In my scenario, clearing the CMOS with a motherboard’s jumper is the panacea to the health of my computer.  By the way, here is my warning, don’t get physical with your computer’s motherboard unless you know what you are doing!  Warning is here for a reason… just in case you would blame me for your motherboard screw up when you find yourself in a similar situation as mine.  Anyhow, if you ever find yourself in this similar situation, I think clearing the CMOS will get your computer going again!

Virtual Machine Is A Very Beautiful Thing

Virtual machine is a very beautiful thing, but the majority computer users might be ignorant of it.  How beautiful virtual machine is?  Let me just say this right off the bat, virtual machine is there to piss off evil doers!  It’s so beautiful that you can basically download computer viruses onto a virtual machine without the fear of these nasty things go around and infect a physical machine.  Of course, with just about anything, if one is so inept in computer things, one might be able to allow the computer viruses and what not to infect the whole Intranet (LAN) network even one is using a virtual machine.  Nonetheless, one has to be very inept to do so.  For an example, allowing virtual machine to be on the same subnet with a physical machine without its own protection measures (i.e., antivirus, firewall and what not) — thus, showing just another door to the evil doers.  The evil doers can use a compromised active virtual machine as a gateway for their Intranet (LAN) hacking activities.  The beautiful thing is that if one is smart enough to secure a virtual machine, one basically has a hardened sandbox which can easily be used as a platform for browsing the dangerous web at will.  Perhaps, even downloading computer viruses and what not for testing purposes such as testing to see the effectiveness of an antivirus program.  Professional antivirus software reviewers are mostly using a hardened virtual machine to test to see how effective an antivirus program can be.

Virtual machine is so beautiful that it is very perverted.  How?  I’ve heard how many people have seen their computers got infected with computer viruses, worms, trojans, and what not just because they have been browsing dangerous pornographic websites.  What’s worse is that these folks do not use readily available simple measures such as Javascript blocker software/plugins (e.g., ScriptSafe, Noscript, etc…).  For an example, I’d talked to one person who complained that he would format his computer often, because he caught too many computer viruses.  This very person would like to say that he’s an advance computer user.  Nonetheless, he’d told me that he befuddled how his Windows machine kept on catching a flu (i.e., sarcasm for computer viruses).  Furthermore, he told me that it was too easy for his computer to catch a flu whenever he got perverted.  Obviously, it meant that he browsed pornographic websites and his computer caught a flu.  In the end, he told me his assumption that there’s no way a PC can be OK if one is browsing a pornographic website.  I told him flat out that he’s dead wrong.  The simplest answer I could give to him at that point was that just make sure his physical machine is clean (i.e., not being infected with any computer virus) and then install a virtual machine.

Virtual machine is beautiful since it’s allowing us to have a secure sandbox to play around.  Of course, it’s a bit more complicated than just a secure sandbox, because a virtual machine can run just about all major operating systems.  Furthermore, a virtual machine can be a quick testing ground for security software and what not.  If a virtual machine user doesn’t like what he or she sees, he or she can simply go through few clicks to delete a virtual machine and make a new one.  My suggestion for whoever that does browse the web dangerously is to install a virtual machine on a clean physical machine, install Linux such as Ubuntu, install firewall and ClamAV onto Ubuntu, harden up Ubuntu (virtual machine) as if it’s running on a real machine, and then browse the dangerous web.

Virtual machine is a strange beast, because it can do certain things exceptionally well and efficient, but it can be totally useless at times.  For an example, playing games on a virtual machine is a no no.  First of all, a virtual machine does not use a dedicated graphic card, because it’s emulating one.  Even if a virtual machine environment allows a physical computer to share dedicated graphic resources, I doubt a virtual machine could really share dedicated graphic resources efficiently.  Playing intensive graphic resource demanding games would be almost impossible.  Nonetheless, if one uses a virtual machine for applications such as virtualizing a NAS (i.e., Network Attached Storage server), it can become very interesting.  Imagining this further, how interesting it is for one to be able to clone a virtualized NAS easily, right?  Virtual machine platforms such as VirtualBox is certainly carrying the option of allowing a computer user to clone a virtual machine through few clicks of a mouse.

In summary, virtual machine is very beautiful, but the degrees of beautifulness are scaling accordingly according to whoever is using it.  One can simply use a virtual machine to test out how effective an antivirus software can be, but one can also use it to run a virtualized NAS.  If one is horny, one can simply browse the dangerous pornographic websites with a virtual machine.  Basically, virtual machine is quite useful and secure if one knows how to use it as a sandbox.

 

How To Use CrashPlan To Backup Data To QNAP And Backup QNAP’s Data To CrashPlan Central

Normally, CrashPlan won’t allow you to backup computer data to network share/drive.  Nonetheless, you can get around this if you’re using iSCSI.  In the video right after the break, I show you how to create iSCSI with QNAP (Network Attached Storage) server,  connect to QNAP’s iSCSI target, and format iSCSI share as NTFS share for Windows 7/8.  This way, you can use CrashPlan software (free or paid) to backup data from a local computer to QNAP’s iSCSI share, and you can go one step further by backing up the data of iSCSI share (on QNAP or whatever NAS that may be) to CrashPlan Central (cloud service for hosting backup data).  Enjoy!!!