How To Permanently Map Network Share To Mac OS X Yosemite

Awhile back I had made a video which shows Mac beginners how to permanently add a network share/drive to Mac OS X Mavericks.  This very video is still applicable for Apple’s newest OS X Yosemite.  Just in case anyone really needs to know this trick, just watch my video right after the break.  Here once again, I repost the video.  Enjoy!!!

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Make Backup Before Ditching Mac OS X Mavericks For Yosemite

Are you using Mac OS?  If you are, you probably have heard all about how Apple just released the newest yet Mac OS X Yosemite.  I’d read some of the comments on various websites, and it seems that people are having mixed feeling about Apple’s newest OS.  Some people think Mac OS X Yosemite is ugly or just too plain.  In my opinion, I like it so far, because I like Apple’s simplicity design UI (User Interface) for Mac OS X.    With OS X Yosemite, things look to be simplified even further in term of the look of the OS.  Basically, Apple is trying to make Mac OS X to look like iOS, giving the users a feeling of unification between the two different systems.  Just like how Microsoft is trying to unify Windows Desktop and Windows Phone operating systems, Apple is doing the same thing.  I guess, by combining the ecosystems of the two systems together, thus Microsoft and Apple can provide same services for both systems (i.e., mobile devices and desktop computers).  Besides the point of providing the same services for both systems, these two companies are trying to create a togetherness feeling for applications and whatnot, thus providing a smooth service for different types of devices/systems.  I like this idea very much!

Although I like the idea of combining different ecosystems of different types of devices and systems together so the endusers can feel the applications that they work with become smoother in term of workflow and playflow (I made this word up), but to make the togetherness feeling happens Apple has to pool the services into the cloud.  This might be a good thing but also a bad thing!  For an example, iCloud is now becoming iCloud Drive — which is a good thing as endusers can now selectively browse the individual data within — and iCloud Drive will become evermore the focus point for hackers to try with hardy effort to hack into endusers’ data.  As Apple relies more on the cloud to provide essential services for endusers’ apps, it’s imperatively evermore for hackers to target Apple’s cloud services since endusers’ data are most likely pool abundantly into the cloud.  Instead of chasing different targets, hackers can just hack endusers’ cloud data to harvest whatever they need with less time wasting.  Cloud is good for endusers’ togetherness feeling, but it’s bad for endusers’ data security if Apple will ever provide the opportunity for hackers to loot endusers’ data.  In my opinion, Apple’s newest OS yet [cloudworries] me.  Recently, hackers were successfully hacked into banks and Home Depot, thus millions of endusers’ confidential data are at risks of being exposed to the blackmarket.

Besides of being dangerous but pretty and simplistic, you may find that it’s rather dangerously thrilling to upgrade Mavericks to Yosemite.  If you don’t do any backup for your Mavericks, you may not want to rush to upgrade to Yosemite.  I found out that once you upgrade to Yosemite, you cannot downgrade your Yosemite to Mavericks unless you wipe your hard drive cleanly and freshly install Mavericks.  Of course, others may have ways to downgrade Yosemite to Mavericks that I do not know of, but it’s for sure that Yosemite destroys the Mavericks’ built-in recovery partition and creates a Yosemite recovery partition.  This means that when you want to reinstall OS X through the fresh boot up or reboot gray screen using Command + R keys on the keyboard, Yosemite is the only built-in recovery you get to play with after you had upgraded the Mavericks to Yosemite.  Even if you have a USB thumb drive for Mavericks’ root installation files, Yosemite will complain how your Mavericks’ files are too old, consequently you cannot use the Mavericks’ files to downgrade Yosemite.

I’ve found this out the hard way as I had to wipe out my Mac HD just so to reinstall Yosemite fresh in order for Yosemite to work correctly on my Mac.   Luckily, I’d made backups of my essential data on my Mac before I said goodbye to all of my essential data.  Basically, the trouble was all about how Yosemite refused to let my Mac to have any Internet connectivity.  After I meddling with all network settings to be sure that the settings were right, Yosemite was even more steadfast in not allowing my Mac to have any Internet connectivity.  My only option left was to freshly reinstall Yosemite, because downgrading Yosemite to Mavericks might just be a lot harder.  Luckily, fresh installation of Yosemite was the solution.  Now, my Mac is connecting to the Internet just fine, and I’m having a blast of writing this blog post on Yosemite.  Like I said, please do many backups of your data before you even think about letting go of Mavericks or whatever OS X version you’re on, because Yosemite is that dangerously pretty and simplistic and cloudworried.

I found a pretty good YouTube video which explains Yosemite’s newest features in detail.  Enjoy the video right after the break!!!

How To Map A Network Share To Mac OS 10.9 (Mavericks) Permanently

Within the video right after the break, I show you how to map a network share to your Mac OS 10.9 (Mavericks) permanently.  This way, whenever you reboot or first boot up your Mac, the network share folder will automatically be connected to the NAS (network attached storage server).  Enjoy!!!

With The New Mavericks, I Found Love In Bitdefender Virus Scanner

English: An "X" colored to be simila...

English: An “X” colored to be similar to the logo for Mac OS X tiger (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I just got done updating my MacBook Pro to the latest Mac OS X which is the Mavericks.  Coincidentally with the Mavericks update, my Kaspersky antivirus for Mac is about to be expired, seven days to be exact, and so I was frantically searching for a good alternative.  I downloaded all sorts of antivirus for Mac out there, but I found many of them had performed poorly or not worked at all with Mac OS X Mavericks.  Luckily, I found one that is working rather well with Mac OS X Mavericks at this point in time.  I didn’t even have to download it on a strange website, because it is readily available in the Mac App Store.  Basically, I pulled my hair out for nothing!  The antivirus I’m talking of is the Bitdefender Virus Scanner.

You can download Bitdefender Virus Scanner for free in the Mac App Store.  This antivirus app runs well, and I haven’t found any trouble with it yet.  It does not slow down my MacBook Pro at all, and so this is a really big plus.  I found most Mac antivirus software tend to slow down my MacBook Pro a lot, but Bitdefender Virus Scanner proves to be not this sort of case at all.  One downside to this Mac antivirus app is that it does not have a real time monitoring/scanning feature.  You know how the antivirus software on Windows would behave?  (Lurking in the background and checking to see if there is a malicious process!)

Bitdefender Virus Scanner also got a paid version, and you can also find it in the Mac App Store.  I think it is being called as Virus Scanner Plus.  I think the paid version comes with more features such as Continuous Scan, but I don’t really know what this feature does since I haven’t yet bought the paid version.

I combine Bitdefender Virus Scanner with Little Snitch Network Monitor to add an additional sound security defense measure for my MacBook Pro.  The first line of defense is obviously would be the Mac OS X Mavericks’ default firewall.  Still, you can never know how much computer security measures would be enough, because there is always that somebody who knows just enough to poke a hole through your computer security defense.  I hope this little confession of mine will be of some help to Mac users who are thinking of adding an antivirus program to their computer security defense.

What About Lumia 920? (My Breakaway from iOS Ecosystem)

Usually, people would rather trade in their whatever brand of smartphone for an iPhone 5, but I did the opposite.  I ran away from iPhone 5 by gave it away to a family member, bought Lumia 920 instead.  What’s the big deal you ask?  Probably not to you, but it’s to me.  I like to think that I had successfully completed a challenge, and the challenge was for me to break away from iOS ecosystem.  Basically, once you’re tied into any digital ecosystem, whether that be iOS ecosystem, it would be super hard to break away from it.  Unless many digital ecosystems begin to have the same amount of apps and features, breaking away from one digital ecosystem for another is like to throw away all the money you had spent in one ecosystem for all that time.  For me, it wasn’t a big deal and I did not break any sweat.  How come?  Well, watch the video right after the break and you will know.  Within the video right after the break, I also make a brief comparison between iPhone 5 and Lumia 920.  So, enjoy!!!

iPad Mini Review

Got my hand on iPad Mini, and so I reviewed it in a video.  Enjoy!!!