Keyboard Failure On Boot, Clearing CMOS Is A Possible Panacea

I got a scare today!  My computer’s motherboard can sometimes be very unfriendly.  What had happened was that I turned off my computer while the Mobo was trying to boot up the BIOS, and this was when I got the scare as the Mobo would spit out keyboard failure error on the next boot up.  I’m telling you this, if you never have had experience this with your computer, you would not know the panic and frustration of this scare!  Keyboard failure error on boot would not allow you to use your keyboard at all to bypass the black error screen stage even though the screen would encourage you to press F1 or F2 to get pass it.  Trust me, I had tried to press just about anything on the keyboard to have a try at getting pass this scary black screen of death, but nothing would work!

Naturally, I went into instinctive mode by switching out the USB port for the keyboard’s USB connector, but this was a futile effort.  I watched a YouTube video that suggested of pressing F1 really fast till at certain point and then holding down F1 till certain point on boot up to get pass the black screen of death, but this method just did not do it for me.

Consequentially, I got physical with the Mobo by accessing it physically!  Don’t worry, the Mobo is fine, because I did not punch or kick it.  Anyhow,  what I did was clearing CMOS using the jumper on the Mobo.  I don’t know about your Mobo, but mine came with 2 jumpers.  The first jumper got 2 slots to slip onto 2 pins of the first three pins jumper group, and the second jumper got 2 slots also to slip onto the 2 pins of the last three pins jumper group.  In my case, I had to remove the first jumper physically from the first three pins group and slip the jumper onto the first and second pins of the first three pins group.  Right after, I repositioned the graphics card and what not so the computer would run normally as before, I powered my computer back on.  Of course, nothing would happen, because the jumper wasn’t in the right position for anything to work, and so I had to remove and reposition the jumper to the second and third pins of the first three pins jumper group.  Once again, the pain of reaching the jumper slots meant I had to remove the graphics card from its slot, but the inconvenience was unavoidable.  Unfortunately, even after clearing the CMOS with the jumper, my Mobo was still spitting out the keyboard failure error on boot.  Back to square one!

Onto the second method of clearing CMOS, I removed the CMOS battery from the Mobo for at least thirty minutes.  Afterward, I repositioned the CMOS battery and rebooted the computer.  Unfortunately, even this would not get me pass the black screen of death!  Naturally, I thought that my computer was done for!

Fortunately, after the second try of clearing the CMOS with the motherboard’s first three pins jumper/group, the computer was finally booted pass the black screen of death.  Windows is now booting up just fine as the result, and I’m able to use the keyboard just fine.  Everything else works just fine also!  The scare is finally over!

In summary, clearing the CMOS should be your last resort to fix most BIOS related failure errors on boot!  Of course, even clearing the CMOS sometimes won’t get your computer going again, because your computer’s motherboard might be done for at this stage for whatever reasons!  Another possibility is that the CMOS battery could have died on you and need a replacement before clearing the CMOS would actually work as intended!  In my scenario, clearing the CMOS with a motherboard’s jumper is the panacea to the health of my computer.  By the way, here is my warning, don’t get physical with your computer’s motherboard unless you know what you are doing!  Warning is here for a reason… just in case you would blame me for your motherboard screw up when you find yourself in a similar situation as mine.  Anyhow, if you ever find yourself in this similar situation, I think clearing the CMOS will get your computer going again!

Installing And Securing Linux Mint 17, And Installing Adobe Reader

I was installing Linux Mint 17 for a virtual machine on my PC, and I decided it was a good idea to record the whole process.  Furthermore, I also installed Adobe Reader manually on Linux Mint 17, and so by watching this video you will also know how to do this.  If you’re trying to do what I’ve done within this video, make sure you do not deny shell access and lock the password for the regular user or users that you want to use, because if doing so you will not be able to log into the system.  Of course, if you follow my video closely, deny shell access means editing the /etc/passwd file, and lock password means editing the /etc/shadow file by executing the command line passwd -l [username].

Moreover, if you’re trying to edit the /etc/fstab file as I’d done in the video, make sure you make a copy of the original /etc/fstab file first before editing the original /etc/fstab file.  /etc/fstab file is very important, because it tells the system how to load up the devices such as hard drive, and screwing this file up will prevent your system from loading/booting.  Having the original copy of /etc/fstab file will allow you to restore it in the case that you screw up the original /etc/fstab file.

If you are going to pay close attention to my part of editing /etc/fstab file, you will notice that I’d made error on adding rw option to the /tmp and /dev/shm devices, but you will also notice that I had correct the errors in the video few seconds later.  Basically, rw option is correct, but in the video, before I made the option as rw I had the option as wr.  By having the option as wr, the system won’t recognize this option.  So instead of wr, it should be rw.

rw is a permission option.  By adding rw option to /tmp and /dev/shm, the /tmp and /dev/shm devices won’t allow anything to execute commands in these devices, but these devices only allow whatever to read and write to them.  Anyhow, you can check out this video right after the break.  Enjoy!!!

Allowing Specific IP Addresses To Access QNAP’s Web Apps Using .htaccess File And Preventing All Other IP Addresses From Meddling With QNAP’s Web Apps

If you’re using QNAP as a NAS, you probably know that QNAP allows you to install web apps onto QNAP server.  Web apps are cool, but these web apps can be a security nightmare.  This is why you often have to upgrade these web apps.  One example of a popular web app that you can install on QNAP server is WordPress.  Anyhow, whether a web app might carry a computer vulnerability or not, you want to secure your QNAP’s web apps with .htaccess file.  By adding .htaccess file to /share/Web directory in QNAP server, you add one more hoop (security layer) for hackers to have dealt with.  In the video right after the break, I’m going to show you how to add a very simple .htaccess file to QNAP’s /share/Web directory to thwart a possible malicious user which might be able to bypass the router’s firewall and hack your QNAP server using web apps’ vulnerabilities.  Enjoy!!!

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