Today, Google And Major Internet Companies Are Turning On Their IPv6 Tap

An illustration of an example IPv6 address

Google and other major Internet companies are going to turn on their IPv6 capability on June 6th of 2012.  They all agree and think that IPv4 will be running out of IP addresses very soon.  When IPv4 runs out of IP addresses, the Internet will be limited to only 4 billions, roughly around this number, Internet connected devices.  Nonetheless, we should know that IPv4 can only run out of IP addresses for real if only if all IPv4 IP addresses are online at the same time.  Still, the human population is already 7 billion plus, therefore when enough people out there want to have their own mobile devices — and at home they all want smart home devices that may carry IP addresses — the Internet will definitely choke when IPv4 has no IP address left to distribute.  Instead of limiting to only 4 billion plus IP addresses, IPv6 is capable of distributing 340 trillion trillion trillion IP addresses.  This is some gigantic number that I don’t think I will ever get my head to wrap around it, but the computers won’t mind!!!  Anyhow, IPv6 ensures that the Internet will be able to handle just about any device that wants to connect to the Internet, because it has so much IP addresses to give out at any one time.  Even if everyone of us on the planet earth will have at least one Internet connected device, IPv6 is still going to chuck along as if it is eating a Sundae Ice Cream.  Nonetheless, we are prophetically sure that the future, each and everyone of us will have not only one but many more Internet connected devices.  Check out the video right after the break to see one of the Internet founding fathers, Vint Cerf, talks about why we are desperately needed to use IPv6.

Source:  http://www.google.com/intl/en/ipv6/

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Can Comcast Ditching 250 GB Data Cap Be A Sign For A Future Of Which The Old Media Becomes The Radio Of Today?

Picture of a Comcast service vehicle taken in ...

Picture of a Comcast service vehicle taken in an open area from a public street in Macomb, Illinois 61455 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

PCMAG reported that Comcast will ditch the 250GB data cap for their customers soon, because Comcast is exploring the option of increasing the data cap beyond 250GB.  When questioned, Comcast refused to say that people needed more bandwidth, instead they said nowadays it simply makes sense to have their customers with bigger data cap since online videos are becoming evermore popular.  In my opinion, I think sooner or later, the ISP industry will get evermore competitive and people will use more data than the data cap allows.  The people who need more bandwidth will just have to leave the ISPs that do not provide bigger data cap.

Google might speed up the adoption of which to abandon the data cap altogether.  Obviously, I’m looking at how Google is providing 100 times faster than today Internet connection speed for Kansas City, KS and Kansas City, MO.  Perhaps, once Google thinks that they will reap even more profits by providing ultra fast fiber broadband beyond Kansas City, KS and Kansas City, MO., then the competition will definitely push more ISPs to rethink about data cap logic.

Sure, Google has deeper intention for offering ultra fast fiber broadband.  I think Google wants to make sure they have the experience in providing ISP service, because Google never knows that they might need to roll out their very own ISP service to just about anyone who relies on Google services.  Perhaps, Google fears that one day ISPs will be able to dictate what people can watch and download over the Internet.  If such a day will happen, Google’s ultra fast fiber broadband will be able to aid Google in providing Google whatever services over the web to just about anybody as usual.  Google will always be the master of its own Internet services!

Google is so depending on the Internet for its prosperity, therefore no matter is too small to be overlooked when it comes to how Google does business over the Internet — ultra fast fiber broadband service/experiment is definitely a defensive and possibly an offensive strategy.  I don’t think Google ultra fast fiber broadband has data cap, but I’m not sure.  Nonetheless, I think Google wants to promote a future where data can roam just about anywhere without being restrained by the data cap limitation.  It makes sense, because Google core business relies on unrestrained Internet.  One good example would be YouTube.  Sure, Adwords is what making Google the most money, but YouTube, in the near future, might be the most important medium of which to allow Google to increase its core business might (i.e., Internet advertising — Adwords and Adsense).  Of course, nobody would know for sure that YouTube will play out as we think Google has hoped, but at the rate of everyone is slowly ditching the traditional TV for online media — it’s only a matter of time when online media will rule the world and the traditional media (i.e., TV) has to become something like the radio of today.  So, in order for Google to prosper in the upcoming media order, Google has to make sure that YouTube will become evermore popular and people will want to stream YouTube videos evermore.

Google’s YouTube might be so powerful as to how it will attract advertising dollars like nobody has ever seen something like it before.  How come?  Imagine regular TVs will tune into YouTube channels and not the traditional TV channels.  Such a future is probably where YouTube wants to be!  I think such a future for YouTube is very very possible!  Google is creating and promoting original TV type of contents for YouTube, therefore this sort of actions from Google confirms the importance of YouTube in regarding to Google’s media/advertising business.

Google is probably not the only one who thinks about how important it is for folks to be able to use the Internet without data cap, because there are so many other companies out there whose sole business relies entirely on the Internet.  Especially Netflix, because Netflix relies on the ISPs not to tighten the data cap as Netflix customers need to be able to stream Netflix movies.  Eventually, the old media will see that it’s futile to hold back the wave of the new media, therefore I think data cap strategy is too narrow.  Even the ISPs will be able to profit hugely when data cap limitation will no longer be around.  How come?  Like I had mentioned earlier, people will just have to leave the ISPs that are not providing them enough bandwidth.  Some of you might argue that people might not be able to leave their old ISP, because there won’t be a second ISP within the same broadband coverage area.  Well, I think such thinking will be outdated.  How come?  We can just take a look at Google ultra fast fiber broadband experimentation and know that the future for ISP industry will be a lot more competitive.  I sure hope the future will allow people to have a lot more choice of choosing an ISP, and I think we are heading for such a future anyway.  This is why data cap is just too narrow of a strategy — a strategy which will make ISP industry looks petty and the rest look eager to push ahead for a brighter better broadband/Internet future.

Afterthought:  I don’t think to do away with data cap is to encourage piracy.  People who want to pirate are the people who will never pay for the things that they want to pirate in the first place, therefore forcing onto them with data cap plans is like asking them to be more prudent with what they want to pirate.  Furthermore, people who have great technological knowledge might hack into various networks so they can use such networks’ resources (e.g., bandwidth, storage space) for their piracy activities anyway.  This is why data cap is senseless for a future that relies evermore on a busier Internet/broadband highways.

Sources:

Will It Be Possible And Cool To Have Boot An Operating System From/Over The Web?

Internet

Internet (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here is a crazy idea that just pops into my brain/mind.  I wonder, if one day computer users don’t have to worry about bandwidth limitation and bandwidth cost, will it be possible and cool to have boot an operating system from/over the web (i.e., Internet)?  I guess I like the idea of no question is too stupid to be pondered upon or have asked!

Update:  I don’t mean this as in remote desktop or anything like that OK?  It’s more of like taking a traditional operating system such as Windows and boot it from the cloud, but yet one can experience this kind of computing as if one use a traditional operating system locally.  Imagining you can boot multiple operating systems at the same time on one computer screen, switching between them effortlessly!  How’s that eh?

Update:  Furthermore, with this idea in mind, can consumer spend less on computing hardware (but might be more on cloud fees) since they might only need a smart computer monitor (i.e., designs to connect directly to the Internet), a router, and an Internet connection?  Whether this be a good thing or not, I don’t know!

ISPs Should Not Be Policing Web Traffic, Because Privacy Matters!

Arstechnica reports that RIAA and ISPs will monitor your web traffic, starting in the second quarter of this year (i.e., 2012).  I feel this is a very wrong approach to stop online piracy!  Online piracy isn’t terrorism, and so we should not use this draconian measure in an effort to weed out online piracy, because this will make online privacy even worse than how it’s now (i.e., some social networks might be too eager to implement web features that strip away better online privacy).

Do I have to worry about my normal web traffic being monitored by ISPs?  Of course, normal web traffic has nothing to be worried about being flagged as traffic of pirating contents, but I have the feeling that people might not feel so good of knowing they’re being watched constantly.  It’s the same idea as I do not want my phone company to listen into every conversation I have had or will have with my folks.

God knows what they might do with such phone conversations, right?  They might store my phone conversations forever!  I might have nothing to hide, but I might fear I do sound stupid during those conversations and do not ever want to be reminded of.  Sure, they might not or if ever reveal those phone conversations of mine to anyone or even me, but do I want to know that they have my stupid phone conversations on record forever or however long?

You see, it’s logical for people to fear that they’re being watched as if they are guilty of something even though they have done nothing wrong!  I don’t think people will be happy if they know their ISPs are constantly watching them for the sake of the entertainment industry — but not every customer of each ISP is the customer of the entertainment industry — therefore not everyone who is the customer of an ISP should be subjected to be scrutinized for the sake of the entertainment industry!

If I’m wrong on all points, I still think ISPs’ customers deserve to be treated as customers and not some criminals from the start!  What do you think?  You can check out Arstechnica’s RIAA and ISPs to police your traffic this summer (updated) article/report to read more on ISPs to monitor your web traffic.

Bandwidth Cap Is Bad For Data In The Cloud

English: Diagram showing three main types of c...

Image via Wikipedia

We know data in the cloud might be a good idea, but there are few hesitations come to mind that make data in the cloud a good idea but not practical.  We know data in the cloud might be subjected to security risk, losing one’s right to data (you never know), and bandwidth limitation!  The other two are obvious, but let me focus on the last which is even more obvious.  Yes, bandwidth is what making data in the cloud for average users a good idea but not practical.  Home users, not enterprise users, are facing data caps from their ISPs.  Many ISPs are so gung-ho in capping home users’ bandwidth around 100 Gigabyte to 250 Gigabyte range.  Sure, 100 GB to 250 GB range sounds like a lot, but believe me it’s not if home users decide to backup their huge 650 GB to 2 Terabyte worth of data onto the cloud!  It’s now obvious that data in the cloud is simply not a computing tool/solution for everyday folks, isn’t it?

The Vibrance Of The Internet Would Wither Away Starting With SOPA Passes As Law; The Day The Internet Ceases To Exist Is When More Countries Begin To Form Their Own National Intranets

Turkey internet ban protest 2011

Image via Wikipedia

I’ve a feeling that when SOPA becomes law, it encourages not only the United States but many other countries to eventually form each own national Intranet.  Consequently, the Internet that we know so well at this point in time will cease to exist.  Say what?

Wait, let me backtrack a bit to clarify something so you can see where I’m going with this.  So, how come SOPA will encourage the United States and other countries to form each own national Intranet?  SOPA is a bill which disrespects the vibrance of the Internet.  It encourages the breaking up of the Internet since it implies the United States would easily overlook mistakes on shutting down websites of the world by doing it fast and effective at the DNS level.  Nonetheless, we know that even though United Sates can shut down websites of the world through DNS under SOPA, the websites that are being targeted by SOPA can still easily adopt DNS servers outside of the United States and effectively avoid SOPA effect altogether.  Instead of solving problems of piracy, SOPA encourages nations of the world to form their own SOPA.  By forming their own SOPA, each nation of the world will be able to disrupt foreign websites that are doing business within their nation.  As SOPA leads the way to disrespect the vibrance of the Internet, I think more rules and regulations might follow and lead to a point where each nation of the world will have their own national Intranet.

The day the Internet ceases to exist is when more countries begin to form their own national Intranets.  When the Internet ceases to exist, each nation with their own Intranet can be more effective in regulating, tracking, filtering, firewall-ing, and managing the networks within a nation.  What Intranet does is to prevent people from being able to surf for information, knowledge, educational materials, shopping online, and communicating with others from foreign countries other than the nation itself.  E-commerce of today would cease to be the same.  Intranet would only encourage the exchanges of businesses and consumers within a nation only (i.e., preventing the exchanges of businesses and consumers outside the Intranet), because it will not be effective in firewall-ing people if it cannot prevent people from surfing for whatever that are beyond the scope of the Intranet.  I think it’s critical for SOPA to be stopped at all cost, or else the vibrance of the Internet would wither away starting with SOPA passes as law.

What worse is that only the innocent computer users might be affected by a national Intranet.  Technological savvy users might be able to use alternative technology or hack the national Intranet so they can circumvent the restrictions of a national Intranet.  This might prove the point that an Intranet is anti-business, anti-consumer, anti-innovation, and anti-knowledge-exchange (i.e., educational materials to be limitedly shared only within a nation, consequently preventing the people of the world to exchange educational materials with each other.)  I do feel the openness of the Internet must be protected at all cost, or else the vibrance of the Internet would cease to exist and might be too hard to be revived by then!

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