Be The Master Of Your ownCloud Data, Installing ownCloud And Run A Similar DropBox Service Privately For Free

Dropbox and various online third party cloud services are great and free to certain expectations, but to truly have all you can eat buffet kind of expectation is definitely not the kind of thing that these cloud services can provide.  Right off the bat, one thing for sure that these third party cloud services cannot provide is the best privacy level that one could get with having storing data within one’s own private network.  Want to have more cloud space than the so called free space?  It’s not free, and you have to pay more for how many more Gigabytes you want and so forth.

ownCloud is a free, open source software which acts like DropBox, but you can download, install, and use it freely.  I think ownCloud does give you the opportunity to be 100% in control of your data’s privacy.  If you know how to implement robust security measures such as proper firewall and port-forwarding, you can even allow yourself to roam the seven seas and still be able to sync with your local data securely.  Unlike DropBox and other third party cloud services, you know you’re the master of your own data in the cloud when it comes to ownCloud those data.  OK, I begin to rant on unnecessarily.

Anyhow, want to know how to install ownCloud and use it?  Check out the video right after the break, I show you how to install ownCloud on Linux Mint.  Of course, you can follow the video’s instruction to do the same for Ubuntu, because Linux Mint is just an Ubuntu based distribution.  Enjoy!!!

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How To Use CrashPlan To Backup Data To QNAP And Backup QNAP’s Data To CrashPlan Central

Normally, CrashPlan won’t allow you to backup computer data to network share/drive.  Nonetheless, you can get around this if you’re using iSCSI.  In the video right after the break, I show you how to create iSCSI with QNAP (Network Attached Storage) server,  connect to QNAP’s iSCSI target, and format iSCSI share as NTFS share for Windows 7/8.  This way, you can use CrashPlan software (free or paid) to backup data from a local computer to QNAP’s iSCSI share, and you can go one step further by backing up the data of iSCSI share (on QNAP or whatever NAS that may be) to CrashPlan Central (cloud service for hosting backup data).  Enjoy!!!

Sending Email Attachment Larger Than 25MB Through Gmail Email Using Google Drive

English: Gmail logo

English: Gmail logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Today, I’ve found out that sending an attachment which is larger than 25MB or so won’t be possible through Gmail email.  Luckily, Gmail email service is intertwining with Google’s other web applications such as Google Drive, and through Google Drive I’m able to send attachment which is larger than 25MB.  Don’t know if it’s true or not, you can basically tell Gmail email to insert an attachment through Google Drive that is large as a decent video file size.  Isn’t it cool?

How To Connect And Mount iSCSI Onto Ubuntu And Linux Mint

In the video right after the break, I show you how to connect to iSCSI target and mount iSCSI LUN onto Ubuntu and Linux Mint.  Enjoy!!!

Using VPN To Access All Local Services Without The Need To Open Up Unnecessary Inbound Ports

Before knowing much about VPN, I usually opened up many inbound ports for my computer firewall and the firewall that resided within the router so remote services such as APF (Apple Time Machine) would function correctly.  Obviously, these remote services (e.g., APF, FTP, CIFS, etc…) are also accessible within local area network, therefore one does not need to have to be outside a local area network to use these remote services.  For an example, one can just sit next to the APF server (i.e., APF which hosts on a network attached storage) and locally backup one’s Mac to the Time Machine service.  When using such services locally, one has to use local IP addresses, because one  is within a local area network (e.g., home network, office network, etc…).

The idea is to open up less ports to protect everything within a local area network better.  So, when one travels abroad, one cannot use local IP addresses to access one’s remote services (e.g., APF, FTP, CIFS, etc…), and one has to open up ports for these remote services so remote access would be possible.  Since one has to open up inbound ports for remote connections, one’s local area network might become more vulnerable.  The more open ports there are, the more exploits that hackers can use to test or attack against the services that rely on the open ports.

Luckily, we have VPN.  VPN stands for Virtual Private Network.  Big companies love to deploy VPN for their employees.  If you have ever met one of those employees from one of those big companies, you might see this person logins into a VPN network through a laptop when this person is away from the company.  Since big companies are using VPN, VPN must be for the elites only right?  Wrong!  Just about anyone can use VPN to protect oneself, and it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to do so.  If you watch other videos of mine within my YouTube channel, you will see how easy it’s to set up VPN server/service on Windows 8.  Anyhow, the whole idea is to open up less ports for a network so everything within a network can be somewhat more secure.

Using VPN, one can access local area network as if one never leaves local area network all along.  For an example, one can sit at a Starbucks and yet connect to remote services(e.g., APF, CIFS, FTP, SSH, etc…) with local IP addresses.  How is this possible?  Like I said, using VPN, one never leaves local area network!  This is why VPN is definitely a better option than just opening up whatever inbound ports there are for different remote services.  With VPN, all one has to do is to open up one port which VPN relies on.  Through the connection of VPN, one then can just access all services within a local area network as if one has never leave a local area network all along.  In case you don’t know, VPN encrypts data automatically.  This is just another reason why I think VPN is definitely a better solution for remote access.

Linux: What About Symbolic Link?

English: Symbolic link diagram (original file ...

English: Symbolic link diagram (original file in grey, link in light blue). Italiano: Schema di collegamento simbolico (in grigio il file originale, in azzurro il collegamento). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When using Linux, you can use symbolic link to create shortcut for the data that you want to work with.  Using symbolic link as shortcut is quite convenient, because you can access some data that might reside in a location that is many many levels deep within a parent directory.  Besides being convenient, symbolic link does have other advantages too.  One of such advantages is to protect the original data from being deleted by accident when a user delete the parent directory where the symbolic link is currently residing in.  Anyhow, you can know a lot more about symbolic link and how to use it through watching the video right after the break.  Enjoy!!!

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