How To Use CrashPlan To Backup Data To QNAP And Backup QNAP’s Data To CrashPlan Central

Normally, CrashPlan won’t allow you to backup computer data to network share/drive.  Nonetheless, you can get around this if you’re using iSCSI.  In the video right after the break, I show you how to create iSCSI with QNAP (Network Attached Storage) server,  connect to QNAP’s iSCSI target, and format iSCSI share as NTFS share for Windows 7/8.  This way, you can use CrashPlan software (free or paid) to backup data from a local computer to QNAP’s iSCSI share, and you can go one step further by backing up the data of iSCSI share (on QNAP or whatever NAS that may be) to CrashPlan Central (cloud service for hosting backup data).  Enjoy!!!

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How To Bypassing The Recycle Bin When Deleting Files On Windows 7 And 8

When deleting files on Windows 7 or 8, these files are not permanently deleted.  Instead of being permanently deleted, the files you’ve deleted are being stored in Recycle Bin.  This is fine and dandy, because the Recycle Bin allows you to recover the deleted files in case you had accidentally deleted them.  Nonetheless, what if your Recycle Bin is residing on Drive C: and yet the files you are trying to delete are on Drive D: (for an example)?  The answer to this very question is that deleting small files in few number will be OK, but if you’re deleting many huge files and in large number of them will definitely be a very slow process (PC will have to move these files from one hard drive to another).  Bypassing the Recycle Bin altogether when deleting files on Windows 7 or 8, you can speed up the process of deleting files (i.e., large files and in large number).  Furthermore, Recycle Bin doesn’t have to store any file, therefore you actually save space for your hard drive (i.e., the hard drive that is hosting the Recycle Bin folder).  Of course the danger of doing this is that you won’t be able to recover the deleted files from the Recycle Bin.  Within the video right after the break, I’ll show you how to enabling the bypassing Recycle Bin when deleting files on Windows 7 and 8 feature.  Enjoy!!!

My Downgrading Of Windows 8.1 To Windows 7 For Reliability And Driver Availability

Sometimes, more whistles and bells don’t mean more if the support foundation isn’t reliable and working just fine.  Windows 8.1 is this very case!  Although Windows 8.1 is bold and exciting, I’ve found it’s too unreliable and not stable.  Perhaps, it’s not Windows 8.1′s fault, but it’s more of that it’s too new and thus not enough drivers that are designed to work with its core services, leading to a very unreliable operating system.  I’ve encountered more computer issues with Windows 8.1 more than any other operating systems that I’ve ever used.  Thus, nowadays, whatever computers in my vicinity that have issues with Windows 8.1, I don’t have any hesitation to downgrade the computer’s Windows 8.1 to Windows 7 operating system.  I’ve to say I’m fond of Windows 7 for its reliability.  Sure, Windows 8.1 is more appealing in term of features and user interface, but reliability is more important in my opinion.  With reliability, Windows users don’t have to waste time in figuring out why their computers suddenly aren’t working the way they should, and such reliability enhances productivity.

As I was downgrading a computer of mine from Windows 8.1 to Windows 7, I’ve found UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) is nice but troublesome.  Nice in a way that UEFI has more whistles and bells and prettier than traditional BIOS user interface, but UEFI is a troublemaker.  How?  When installing other operating system that isn’t Windows 8.1 or newer, computer user might encounter a hairy situation.  For an example, a newbie computer user may not be able to figure out how to enable Boot\CSM(Compatibility Support Module) and set Boot Device Control to UEFI and Legacy OPROM.  Without enabling Boot\CSM support within UEFI Bios settings, a newbie computer user would find that it’s impossible to install Windows 7 and have Windows 7 boot up.  Of course, this would also hold true for installing Linux and other operating systems when a motherboard is using UEFI and not a traditional BIOS settings.

I’ve also found out that when installing Windows 7 under UEFI system, it might be confusing and hard to make sure Windows 7 would install its reserved partition on the intended hard disk/drive.  I’m not sure about you but when I didn’t physically disconnect a second hard drive that is larger than 2 terabyte from the internal arrangement of my PC, Windows 7 got confused and installed reserved partition on the second hard drive, thus nullifying the ability to convert the second hard drive to GPT (GUID Partition Table) filesystem.  Without being able to do a conversion of a second hard drive to GPT partition/filesystem, Windows 7 won’t recognized that my second hard drive is a 3 terabyte drive, thus my PC can only use 2 terabyte out of second hard drive’s 3 terabyte hard disk size/space.  Here is a tip for you, perhaps when installing Windows 7 under UEFI system, you might have to physically disconnect all internal hard drives except for the main hard drive that you are using for installing Windows 7.

Through the trial of downgrading Windows 8.1 to Windows 7 for a PC, now I learn a lot more about UEFI.  According to TechRepublic’s “10 things you should know about UEFI” article, UEFI BIOS user interface supposes to simplify how drivers would be written for most operating systems… which is to write one driver for a specific PC component that would work for all operating systems so a developer won’t have to write different drivers for different operating systems.  Save time and effort!  Nonetheless, in practice UEFI makes life harder for PC users.  Nonetheless, I guess UEFI does have a benefit of making life easier for the developers.  Still, I think more emphases need to be emphasized for PC users, because without PC users (and their happiness) the developers won’t have customers to write software for (thus will not be able to generate incomes).

In conclusion, I think Windows 8.1 is a step in right direction for Microsoft to embolden the effort of improving Windows operating system ecosystem, but Microsoft’s execution is not in synch with the mass.  Drivers for Windows 8.1 should be readied at the inception of the Windows 8.1 official release.  Still, 3 months after the Windows 8.1 official release, I had read many driver compatibility complaints and see many Windows 8.1 driver issues first hand, thus I’m not having an easy time with Windows 8.1.  Instead of relying on Windows 8.1, I’m backpedalling toward the stream of Windows 7.

Source:  http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/10-things/10-things-you-should-know-about-uefi/ (link)

How To Map A Network Share To Mac OS 10.9 (Mavericks) Permanently

Within the video right after the break, I show you how to map a network share to your Mac OS 10.9 (Mavericks) permanently.  This way, whenever you reboot or first boot up your Mac, the network share folder will automatically be connected to the NAS (network attached storage server).  Enjoy!!!

Using External Device As A Share Drive Or Backup Drive For Your QNAP Server

In the video right after the break, I talk about how to use an external device as a share drive or a backup drive for your QNAP server.  On a side note, I think this is a great way to enable USB 3.0 capability for a computer that doesn’t have the motherboard that can support the USB 3.0 adapter.  Keep in mind, if you have a QNAP server that supports USB 3.0 ports, it’s like you have USB 3.0 capability on your local computer.  Basically, you can always tap into the QNAP server’s share drive and tell it to behave as if it’s just another external hard drive on your computer.  Obviously this share drive which is connecting to your QNAP server is using USB 3.0 port, and hence this is why you can enable USB 3.0 capability for your local computer.  This is a stupid reason for you to just go out and buy QNAP server and external hard drive that support USB 3.0 ports, because you can just buy another computer which supports USB 3.0 ports.  Nonetheless, you can definitely take advantage of this beneficial side effect of having a QNAP server as a network attached storage server.  Same story with eSATA capability if your QNAP server supports eSATA ports.  Enjoy the video!!!

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